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Sizing for Storage groups

Posted on 2004-03-29
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Last Modified: 2013-11-15
hello

running E2k on W2k box. Only one storage group created with all users in it - about 200. Priv1.edb is about 13GB. We have loads of free HD space.

What is the recomendation for the number of users/ EDB size per Storage Group. I have to setup more users next week so should I start thinking about creating a second storage group or will the existing one work okay?

Just looking for some advice on the nest way forward. Is there anything else I need to take into account if I create this second storage group??

Thanks in advance

Suzanne
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Question by:suzyreid
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6 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:ktuffner00
ID: 10705467
what version of exchange 2000 are u rinning?  standard only supports one mailbox store and a store up to 16gb and four public folder stores.  exntewrpise supports up to 20 mailbox stores or public folder stores and the storage group or information store is can go to the tb if im not mistake.
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by:kristinaw
ID: 10705800
Suzy,

MS recommends a 35gb limit, although that doesn't appear to be set in stone. See the following for more info:

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;319583

I believe the practical limit has more to do with the amount of time it will take to do a restore. I try not to let my stores get much over 20gb, as it starts taking a fair amount of time to do a restore. The methods of backup/restore you use will cause this amount of time to vary greatly. Do a practice restore on with your current database to get a better idea of how long it would take. Below are notes on how to build a recovery server to do a single mailbox restore, should be a good test for you.

http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=813337


In the Enterprise version, you can have up to 4 storage groups, and you can have up to 5 information stores in each group. See the following for more detail:

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;296614

Feel free to look over the above articles and ask more ?'s, etc. You may need to determine whether you have the standard or Enterprise version before moving forward. If you have the standard version you are coming very close to hitting your 16gb database size limit. You really don't want to let that happen. Try creating another storage group. If it won't let you, you've got the standard version.

hth,
Kris.



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by:suzyreid
ID: 10708706
Thanks for all the advice so far. We are running Enterprise version of Exchange 2000.

Previously I had let the DB get up to 16GB - the size made it very difficult to do offline defrags etc. Had to restore this Db last year and the process took a long time.

The edb is sitting on a 74GB hard disk and I regularly do offline defrags, and enfore mailbox limits to keep the size down. I see from the article that MS recommends a 35Gb limit per store - but that seems very large.

I'm keen to avoid any future hassle and make any restores/maintenance as easy as possible! What do you think - at this point should I create a second storage group and create the new users in there or do as MS recommends and let the existing DB increase?

thanks again.
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by:kristinaw
ID: 10708765
Will respond tomorrow, I'm off to my bowling league!
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kristinaw earned 50 total points
ID: 10714833
suzy,

I would say creating a 2nd storage group wouldn't be a bad idea. Just keep in mind that each storage group has it's own set of logs and gets it's own slice of your server's resources (processor, virtual memory). I back my storage groups up in completely separate jobs as well.

Also, think about how you want to design your environment with the other storage group. I have 'important' users off on their own storage group, in their own database, which is a little smaller, meaning their boxes are more easily recoverable. My other users are split between servers/storage groups as well, A-J on one (or wherever the alphabetical split is), the rest on another, etc. I have about 2500 ppl on two mail servers with no issues.

I keep my stores at 20 gigs or below. Any more than that, with my hardware/software, it takes too long (and too much space) to do a restore. You should decide what works for you, in your environment, and stick with that.

Feel free to ask any more ?'s.

hth,
Kris.
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by:suzyreid
ID: 10722170
Thanx for the help Kris.

Very useful!
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