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What is the command to find the path of my current location?

Posted on 2004-03-29
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Last Modified: 2010-04-21
Hi ALl,

 This must be very simple.  THis is a two fold question.  

1.  What is the Unix command that tells me the complete path of my location.
2.  How can I modify my .profile so that the current location and path is always displayed.

Regards

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Question by:jcosta_sr
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fim32 earned 200 total points
ID: 10709592
pwd

depends on your shell, using .profile so i'll assume ksh?

export PS1=`echo '$PWD> '`

or some such
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by:Tintin
ID: 10709878
1.  /bin/pwd  (note that the shell inbuilt pwd will not resolve symbolic links)
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by:glassd
ID: 10711768
If you are using xterms, amd ksh, try this out. It will display the path in the title bar of the xterm. Useful if the path is long and takes up a significant part of the command line.

Put this in your .profile.

Note that the control characters ^[ and ^G are entered into vi by preceding the character with Ctrl-V, for example Ctrl-V Ctrl-[

case $TERM in
        xterm*)
                HOST=`hostname`
                PS1="${LOGNAME}@$(uname -n): "'^[]0;${HOST}:${PWD}^G'
                ;;
        *)
                PS1='ksh$ '
                ;;
esac

This will show the hostname and user name at the start of then command line and the path in the title bar.



fim32 - you might be intersted in this:

We used to use the '>' character at the end of the prompt but we were cursed by lazy users. Many of them would use the mouse to cut and paste previous commands. Assuming the previous command was 'ls', if they were careless with the mouse they would pick up '> ls'  . If they then pasted this onto a new line they would create an empty file called 'ls'. Since many had './' in there current directory, next time they tried to run 'ls' they tried to run an empty file with incorrect permissions. Once we realised what was happening, we ended up using the colon at the end of the prompt instead.
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by:ahoffmann
ID: 10713036
1. echo "cwd=$cwd; pwd=`/bin/pwd`";/bin/df -k .|/usr/bin/tail -1
2.  depends on your shell, which shell do you use? (check with: echo $SHELL)
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