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Repeated Drive Failure in SCSI Configuration

Posted on 2004-03-29
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A week ago my Adaptec RAID 5 utility reported that a drive had failed and that the hot spare had been used to rebuild the array.  The failed drive (a Seagate ST366706lw) was at address 1.  I shut down system, replaced #1 with a new drive.  System recognized the drive, but formatting failed.  On Friday I got a new drive in place, system recognized drive, formatting was successful and I added it as a spare.  On reboot I could see #1 listed correctly as a hot spare to the array.

Now the drive has failed again, having lasted only about 5 hours!  These are new drives, and the array drives are all the same ones, and they have been reliable, up to now.  My question:  Could it be that the Adaptec 2100S is somehow destroying the drives?  Would it help if I used another address?  I just find it hard to believe that two new Seagate drives in a row, from different sources, would be bad.
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Question by:pkolhoff
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droswell earned 250 total points
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I hate to say it, but it's possible. We've had two drives go one right after the other. I would try one more. If you get three drives, and they all show as bad, I would consider looking at the adapter. I've never gotten three bad SCSI drives in a row. Not to say that wouldn't happen, but your odds become infinitesmially smaller the more drives you try.
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