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Temporary Internet files.....a "*.2" file ?????

Does anyone know what this is?

1987353027@headerspon,pagespon,pagespon2,localad,wxspon,explore1,explore2,explore3,explore4,explore5,explore6,localsite1(repeats local site from 1-6).2

I can't delete and it appears in different variations under Temporary internet files\content.....

I am seeing this on several different clients w2k machines and all it does it ding when i try to delete.

Spybot won't get and neither will any other disk wipe tools.
0
trey84
Asked:
trey84
1 Solution
 
CrazyOneCommented:
Try this open a command window and do this

Open a CMD.EXE window.
CD to the top of the mess.
Use: DIR /X /A   to see the SHORT FILE NAMES of the files and directories there.
Use a combination of CD, RD, and DEL and the SHORT FILES names reported with DIR /X to delete your way to the bottom and then back up the tree removing the files on the way down and the directories on the way up.
Most likely there is NOT a protection issue here so you shouldn't need worry about ownership or file protections.

RMDIR [/S] [/Q] [drive:]path
RD [/S] [/Q] [drive:]path

   /S      Removes all directories and files in the specified directory
           in addition to the directory itself.  Used to remove a directory
           tree.

   /Q      Quiet mode, do not ask if ok to remove a directory tree with /S


This MS KB article may help

How to Remove Files with Reserved Names in Windows
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;120716

BEGIN ARTICLE

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The information in this article applies to:

Microsoft Windows 2000 , Professional
Microsoft Windows 2000 , Server
Microsoft Windows 2000 , Advanced Server
Microsoft Windows 2000 , Datacenter Server
Microsoft Windows NT Server versions 3.1 , 3.5 , 3.51 , 4.0
Microsoft Windows NT Workstation versions 3.1 , 3.5 , 3.51 , 4.0
Microsoft Windows NT Advanced Server
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY
Because applications control the policy for creating files in Windows, files sometimes are created with illegal or reserved names, such as LPT1 or PRN. This article explains how to delete such files using the standard user interface.

MORE INFORMATION
NOTE : You must be logged on locally to the Windows computer to delete these files.

If the file was created on a file allocation table (FAT) partition, you may be able to delete it under MS-DOS using standard command line utilities (such as DEL) with wildcards. For example:

DEL PR?.*

-or-

DEL LPT?.*

These commands do not work on an NTFS partition as NTFS supports the POSIX subsystem and filenames such as PRN are legal under this subsystem. However, the operating system assumes the application that created them can also delete them; therefore, you can use commands native to the POSIX subsystem.

You can delete (unlink) these files using a simple, native POSIX application. For example, the Windows Resource Kit includes such a tool, Rm.exe.

NOTE : POSIX commands are case sensitive. Drives and folders are referenced differently than in MS-DOS. Windows 2000 and later POSIX commands must use the following usage syntax:
posix /c <path\command> [<args>] IE: posix /c c:\rm.exe -d AUX.

Usage assumes Rm.exe is either in the path, or the current folder:
rm -d // driveletter / path using forward slashes / filename
For example, to remove a file or folder named COM1 (located at C:\Program Files\Subdir in this example), type the following command:
rm -d "//C/Program Files/Subdir/COM1"
To remove a folder and its entire contents (C:\Program Files\BadFolder in this example), type the following command:
rm -r "//C/Program Files/BadFolder"
Another option is to use a syntax that bypasses the normal reserve-word checks altogether. For example, you can possibly delete any file with a command such as:
DEL \\.\ driveletter :\ path \ filename
For example:

DEL \\.\c:\somedir\aux

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Published Jun 3 1997 7:28AM  Issue Type  
Last Modifed Dec 22 2001 12:57PM  Additional Query Words 3.10 prodnt CON PRN AUX CLOCK$ NUL COM1 LPT1 LPT2 LPT3 COM2 COM3 COM4 winnt  
Keywords kbusage  

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. Copyright 2002 Microsoft Corporation, One Microsoft Way, Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 U.S.A. All rights reserved.

END ARTICLE
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trey84Author Commented:
Ok, I'll try it.

But what the hell is a *.2 or .6 or .8 file?  

It actually says "2 file" in the file types column
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shailendra_patankarCommented:
HI..

First -> Your hide the firewall, If yes, check the security options
Second -> Check the Add/Remove Program from Control Panel... Any package that u have not installed
Third -> Boot the pc in safe mode without Network option and delete all the *.tmp file..

This may be because of the sites ur are visiting...

Don't go to porn or crack sites....

REply
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feiyauCommented:
Try selecting the file Shift-Del
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feiyauCommented:
I mean

1. Select the file
2. Shift-Del

Do you get an error when you get ding ? Does it say access denied or file is in use? Sometimes some apps(namely IE) may still be locking that file. In this case, you will have to find out why. Does it happen only when you visit certain sites or it happens all the time.
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trey84Author Commented:
that's when I get the ding when I try to delete with shift-del.  No there is not an error message.  Access is denied only when I try to access properties of the file.

All tmp files and the entire temp directory, temp internet files (except above mentioned files) have been deleted.

I don't need the lecture about safe surfing...

Does anyone know what this file is?????
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