Solved

File Sharing Problem with XP over home netwrok

Posted on 2004-03-30
5
3,313 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-11
Ok, this is a problem I have been having for some time now and despite many attempts (and hours!) I have been unable to resolve it. Basically I have two computers networked via cat 5 X over.

Computer A: A desktop with XP home and a broad band connection.

Computer B: A laptop with XP Pro sharing the broadband connection.

Any file can be copied (from a shared folder) from comp B to comp A but only some files copy from comp A to comp B (whilst some don't!!!). The ones that don't error with :-

Cannot copy <filename>: Access is denied

Make sure the disk is not full or write-protected and that the file is not currently in use.

Well, the disk is not full or write protected.  Also the file is not currently in use as it will copy to another directory on the same computer.  It has nothing to do with the folder containing the file, as files in the same folder do copy across the network.

Both computers can ping each other, both can see each others shared folders, they are both in the same workgroup and subnet and the internet connection sharing works fine.  

When I take the file and burn it to a CD ROM the same problem occurs when trying to take it off the CD ROM and put it on comp B!!

The only thing I can think off is it is something to do with the file(s) itself. But what could that be????

Any help, gratefully received!
Chris

P.S. The only type of file affected seems to be MP3. although some MP3's do copy and some don't???
0
Comment
Question by:roodyhoo
5 Comments
 
LVL 44

Accepted Solution

by:
CrazyOne earned 300 total points
ID: 10714174
IN XP home you have to boot to safe mode to set permissions

Ownership

HOW TO: Take Ownership of a File or Folder in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;308421&sd=tech

HOW TO: Set, View, Change, or Remove File and Folder Permissions in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;308418

BEGIN ARTICLE

The information in this article applies to:
Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition
Microsoft Windows XP Professional

IN THIS TASK
SUMMARY
Permissions for Files and Folders
Set, View, Change, or Remove File and Folder Permissions
How Inheritance Affects File and Folder Permissions
To View Effective Permissions on Files and Folders
Manage Shared Folders by Using Computer Management
Troubleshooting
REFERENCES
SUMMARYIn Windows XP, you can apply permissions to files or folders that are located on NTFS file system volumes. This article describes how to set, view, change, or remove permissions for files and folders.

back to the top

Permissions for Files and Folders
Permissions for files and folders include Full Control, Modify, Read & Execute, List Folder Contents, Read, and Write.

NOTE: This article assumes that you are using Windows XP on a domain. By default, simplified sharing is enabled in Windows XP if you are not connected to a domain, which means that the Security tab and advanced options for permissions are not available.

If you are not joined to a domain or are running Windows XP Home Edition and want to view the Security tab, view the Set, View, Change, or Remove File and Folder Permissions section in this article.

back to the top
Set, View, Change, or Remove File and Folder Permissions
To set, view, change, or remove file and folder permissions:
Click Start, click My Computer, and then locate the file or folder for which you want to set permissions.
Right-click the file or folder, click Properties, and then click the Security tab.

NOTE: If the Security tab is not available, view the Troubleshooting section in this article.
Use one of the following steps:
To set permissions for a group or user that does not appear in the Group or user names box, click Add, type the name of the group or user for whom you want to set permissions, and then click OK.
To change or remove permissions from an existing group or user, click the name of the group or user.
Use one of the following steps:
To allow or deny a permission, click to select either the Allow or Deny check box in the Permissions for User or Group box, where User or Group is the name of the user or group.
To remove the group or user from the Group or user names box, click Remove.
IMPORTANT: If you are not joined to a domain or are running Windows XP Home Edition and want to view the Security tab:
Windows XP Professional
Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
Click Appearance and Themes, and then click Folder Options.
Click the View tab, and then click to clear the Use simple file sharing [Recommended] check box in the Advanced settings box.
Windows XP Home Edition
Boot into safe mode, and then log in as Administrator or an Administrative User. The Security tab is available for files or folders that are located on NTFS file system volumes. Notes:
The Everyone group does not include the Anonymous Logon permission.
You can set permissions only on drives formatted to use the NTFS file system.
To change permissions, you must be the owner or have permissions to change permissions by the owner.
Groups or users that are granted Full Control for a folder can delete files and subfolders in that folder, regardless of the permissions that protect the files and subfolders.
If the check boxes in the Permissions for user or group box are shaded or if the Remove button is unavailable, then the file or folder has inherited permissions from the parent folder. For more information about how inheritance affects files and folders, see Windows Help.
When you add a new user or group, by default, the user or group has Read & Execute, List Folder Contents, and Read permissions.
back to the top
How Inheritance Affects File and Folder Permissions
After you set permissions on a parent folder, new files and subfolders that are created in the folder inherit these permissions. If you do not want the files and folders to inherit permissions, click This folder only in the Apply onto box when you set up special permissions for the parent folder. If you want to prevent only certain files or subfolders from inheriting permissions, right-click the file or subfolder, click Properties, click the Security tab, click Advanced, and then click to clear the Inherit from parent the permission entries that apply to child objects. Include these with entries explicitly defined here check box.

If the check boxes are not available, the file or folder has inherited permissions from the parent folder. There are three ways to make changes to inherited permissions:
Make the changes to the parent folder so that the file or folder inherits the permissions.
Click to select the opposite permission ( Allow or Deny) to override the inherited permission.
Click to clear the Inherit from parent the permission entries that apply to child objects. Include these with entries explicitly defined here check box. When you do this, you can make changes to the permissions or remove the user or group from the permissions list. However, the file or folder does not inherit permissions from the parent folder.
In most cases, Deny overrides Allow unless a folder inherits conflicting settings from different parents. When this occurs, the setting that is inherited from the parent that is closest to the object in the subtree has precedence.

When you use the Deny and Allow settings, note that:
Allow permissions are cumulative, so a user's permissions are determined by the cumulative effect of all of the groups to which the user belongs.
Deny permissions override Allow permissions. Use caution when you apply Deny permissions.
Only child objects inherit inheritable permissions. When you set permissions on the parent object, you can decide whether folders or subfolders can inherit them with the Apply onto setting.

You can determine which permissions a user or group has on an object if you view the effective permissions.

back to the top
To View Effective Permissions on Files and Folders
To view effective permissions on files and folders:
Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Windows Explorer.
Locate the file or folder for which you want to view effective permissions.
Right-click the file or folder, click Properties, and then click the Security tab.
Click Advanced, and then click the Effective Permissions tab.
Click Select.
In the Name box, type the name of a user or group, and then click OK. The check boxes that are selected indicate the effective permissions of the user or group for that file or folder.
Notes:
The calculation does not use the following Security Identifiers settings: Anonymous Logon, Authenticated Users, Batch, Creator Group, Creator Owner, Dialup, Enterprise Domain Controllers, Everyone, Network, Proxy, Restricted, Self, Service, System, and Terminal Server User. An example of these settings is if a user tries to remotely access a file.
The Effective Permissions tab displays information that is calculated from the existing permissions entries. Therefore, the information that is displayed on that page is read-only and does not support changing a user's permissions if you select or clear permission check boxes.
back to the top
Manage Shared Files and Folders by Using Computer Management
The Computer Management tool offers a convenient way to manage and view security settings for files and folders. For more information about security and permissions, click Help on the Computer Management toolbar.

To start the Computer Management tool, perform the following steps:
Click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Administrative Tools.
Click Computer Management, and then click Shared Folders.
Double-click Shares to view a list of shared folders. Note that each volume on your computer that is shared displays a dollar sign ($) after the name of the share. These shares are hidden, administrative shares that you cannot modify.
Double-click a shared folder to view the security settings for that folder.
back to the top
Troubleshooting
If the Security tab is not available and you cannot configure permissions for users and groups:
The file or folder that you want to apply permissions to is not on an NTFS file system drive. You can set permissions only on drives that are formatted to use the NTFS file system.
Simple file sharing is enabled. By default, simplified sharing is enabled in Windows XP unless you are on a domain. To work around this behavior, disable Simplified Sharing.
back to the top



REFERENCESFor additional information about special permissions for files and folders, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
Q308419 HOW TO: Set, View, Change, or Remove Special Permissions for Files and Folders
For additional information about how to disable simplified file sharing, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
Q307874 HOW TO: Disable Simplified Sharing and Password-Protect a Shared Folder in Windows XP
back to the top

First Published: Sep 24 2001 8:49AM

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. Copyright 2002 Microsoft Corporation, One Microsoft Way, Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 U.S.A. All rights reserved.
 
END  ARTICLE  
0
 
LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:infotrader
ID: 10715508
CrazyOne never ceased to amaze me with his knowledge on almost all topics, but I do not believe the problem is with file permissions.  The reason being?  >>When I take the file and burn it to a CD ROM the same problem occurs when trying to take it off the CD ROM and put it on comp B!!

NTFS permissions does not get copied over to another partition, especially on CDFS.

One of the possibilities, I believe, is probably the way you have Explorer setup.  You can setup Explorer to "display content" (or something similar).  What happens a lot of times is that when you select the file(s), Explorer loads it to memory (therefore locking it), for "preview" or "playback".  The reason you have "access Denied" (which is a very generic error, you shouldn't read too much into it about "disk space", etc.) is probably because of that.

Another possibiliy would be that you might have some kind of anti-virus software preventing it from copying, or some utilities from blocking access to it.

Another thing you can do is instead of opening up a folder from ComputerB on ComputerA, and copy, why don't you open up a folder from ComputerA on ComputerB and "Push" the content there?

- Info
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:djxerx
ID: 10717436
What are some examples of the filenames that are giving the error?
0
 

Expert Comment

by:bpetros999
ID: 10717863
Just a note that could help : I had a similar situation using xp Pro as file server. There were many strange problems,like "access denied" etc. The problem was that XP pro has hardcoded a maximum of 10 simultaneous connections. If >10 users logged in, the results were unexpectable.
0
 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:kc117
ID: 10729600
I have had this problem with mp3 files myself (among others).  Now what I did to recover the mp3 file is I killed all running processes that were not absolutely required.  Then I converted the mp3 file to wav, then back to mp3 with a different filename.  The file copied fine after that.  Some of the old files had to be wiped with WinHex to get them off of the computer, but I was more than happy to destroy them.  
0

Featured Post

How your wiki can always stay up-to-date

Quip doubles as a “living” wiki and a project management tool that evolves with your organization. As you finish projects in Quip, the work remains, easily accessible to all team members, new and old.
- Increase transparency
- Onboard new hires faster
- Access from mobile/offline

Join & Write a Comment

#Citrix #Citrix Netscaler #HTTP Compression #Load Balance
Data center, now-a-days, is referred as the home of all the advanced technologies. In-fact, most of the businesses are now establishing their entire organizational structure around the IT capabilities.
Viewers will learn how to connect to a wireless network using the network security key. They will also learn how to access the IP address and DNS server for connections that must be done manually. After setting up a router, find the network security…
After creating this article (http://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/23699/Setup-Mikrotik-routers-with-OSPF.html), I decided to make a video (no audio) to show you how to configure the routers and run some trace routes and pings between the 7 sites…

759 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

22 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now