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Posted on 2004-03-31
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Ok I have read many articles here and other places and still can't get this to work.  Someone please try to explain in there words.

Trying to make separate group policy when logon to terminal server.  I have one DC and a member server with TS in app mode.  All win 2K.  I have created OU called terminal servers.  I have put the terminal server in that OU.  I have added a GPO called "Loopback" and have set the loopback option under computer configuration.  I have set the policy to "shut down the system" for only administrators.

When I log in as a normal domain user, I still have the option to shut down the system.  What gives?
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Question by:donnatronious
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by:anupnellip
ID: 10722073
Well I dont think you need to create a policy to do this because by default only administrators & power user group has the right to shutdown the server .
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oBdA earned 500 total points
ID: 10722869
Seems like you're on the right track. Your problem can probably solved by creating another GPO in which you define the "shutdown" (and/or other settings); use the "Loopback" GPO *only* for the loopback setting.

Just in case, here's a complete step-by-step procedure:

1. Create a new OU, put your Terminal Server(s) in there. Create a new GPO in your Terminal Server OU, named, for example "Loopback"; check "deactivate userdefined configuration" (I'm not sure about the English name of that entry) in properties. Edit the GPO and enable: Computer Configuration - Administrative Templates - group policies - Activate Loopback mode for group policies (or similar; as I said, I don't use an English version, so check out the explanation tab if unsure). Set the mode to replace (or merge, whatever suits you better). Leave the default security settings of the GPO.
2. Now you can create your additional GPO(s) for your users in this OU. If possible, check "deactivate computer configuration" in those. Important: Do *not* use the "Loopback" GPO to configure other settings. These GPOs will now only apply if the users logon to a terminal server session (or better: anybody logging on to the server). Depending on your loopback mode setting, your regular user GPOs will still apply, but they will be overridden by the settings defined in your terminal server GPO.
Note that you do (or "may") *not* need to put the users in (or below) the TS OU. New GPOs in that OU will be applied to *all* users logging on using Terminal Services, even though those users are not in/below the TS OU.
To exclude administrators, use the security group filtering. I'd recommend to do the following (for any GPO, not only TS): For every GPO, create a global security group named, for example, GPol<GPO name> (*G*lobal *Pol*icy group for GPO <name>). Make the desired users member of this group. In the security settings for the GPO, remove the "Apply Policy" and "Read Policy" right for the default "Authenticated Users", add it for the proper security group instead. That way you're pretty safe from surprises ...

Loopback Processing of Group Policy
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=231287

How to Apply Group Policy Objects to Terminal Services Servers
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=260370
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Author Comment

by:donnatronious
ID: 10726533
Ok cool it works.  I also denied this towards administrators and that works to.  Now, what is the best way too define a mandatory profile for users who login to this computer?
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Expert Comment

by:surleysue
ID: 12995546
I was struggling with this in my spare time for some while. I discovered if a specific setting in the default domain GPO and the remote GPO in the terminal server OU were each configured, and differently, I could not get loopback to work. I removed the troublesome entries from the default policy, leaving the policy unconfigured in the default policy. Then the remote policy lookback worked. I added a GPO to the domain's list called "workstations" with the specific settings for the workstations. I'm taking this off my to-do list.
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