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Router Setup for 2 Lans/one ADSL connection

Posted on 2004-03-31
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Last Modified: 2013-12-14
I need to setup two small business LAN's off one ADSL connection. I currently have one setup with the router setup with PPoE. I have two IP addresses from the ISP. With the first being the modems address currently.

Here's what I don't understand. I would assume in the setup I want to achieve the DSL modem would have a DHCP address from the ISP. Company 1's router would have a static IP of we will say 105 and the other companys router a static IP of 106. In this scenario static IP would be setup on the routers but under the static IP option of the Linksys wireless broadband router there is no user name and password which my ISP requires. I can't really try all this out until this weekend so I guess I'm looking more for the conceptual setup than trouble shooting.

Do I have the setup correct in my mind and if so how does the Username password thing work out? The only option on the router that gives me all the options I would expect is PPTP which I don't think would be correct in this scenario but heck what do I know.

thanks in advance
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Question by:YouWantMyUserName
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17 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:HDWILKINS
ID: 10741875
I am not totally sure I understand your ADSL setup.  You said you have two IPs and the modem has one??  You also talk about static IPs and I'm not sure if you don't mean public IPs.  Do you have two Ethernet Ports on the modem??  When you say you have two LANs I assum you mean that you have to totally seperate groups of compters that are physically not connected to each other.  I assume you know that when you set this up, they will have a physical connection - and that your goal is to insure that they are not logically connected to each other.

Let me keep this simple.

Attach a router to the modem.  The modem will serve up an IP address to the router and it may be a static IP or a dynamic IP - it really doesn't matter.  The router will negotiate PPPoE if necessary with your ISP and pickup whatever IP the modem is putting out.  (Once you install a router - you will not run PPPoE on any of the computers.)

The router will provide DHCP services to the first LAN and will probably serve up IP addresses in the 192.168.1.x subnet.  These are private dynamic IPs and that gets all the PCs in the first lan on line.  Each PC on that network should be set up to find its IP automatically.

I don't think you need the second public static IP (and I'm not sure you have one.) Connect a second router to the first and in the router setup, change DHCP so that it serves up a different IP subnet (10.10.1.x).   The second router will not need to negotiate PPPoE because the first is already doing that. The second router will pick up DNS from the first and route the outbound traffic.

If you actually have (and pay for) two static IPs, then you can either connect the two routers directly to the modem, or through a hub connected to the modem and set the second router up exactly the same as the first.

In any case, once your start using routers to start sharing a LAN connection, unless you have paid for a 'Range' of IPs for each computer your going to be using Private IPs that should be set up dynamically on the inside of the router/s.

If you let me know more about what your goals are - regarding the physical and logical needs of the two lans, I might be more helpful.

Harry
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Expert Comment

by:calla
ID: 10744815
Thanks Harry

This is YouWantMyUserName. My account is crossways right now. I have purchased and received two static IP's from the ISP. I will be hosting two websites for two small businesses off one DSL connection. I would think one router would have one of the public addresses and another router will have the other. If I use PPoE how does the second router get the second public address?

Bottom line I will be forwardiing ports from two public addresses two two different internal addresses on two different LAN's. I don't want to use the DSL router for anything but the inital connection because the management is terrible. I had planned to use two routers each with their respective public ipaddresses and LANs. Not relevant but I will be controlling DHCP from the server.

thanks again
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Expert Comment

by:HDWILKINS
ID: 10745426
Ok, tell me this - the DSL router - what make and model is it - so that I can look it up and see what it can do.   Just tell me this and I will know a lot about what you have.

I think my real question is how, from a wiring connection standpoint, are you connecting two routers to the one modem.  Is the modem set up for that or do you have to use a hub or switch.

Also, you would be best off to let the routers handle DHCP because there is no advantage of doing that on the server.

Regarding PPPoE.  Either PPPoE is required by your ISP, or it isn't.  PPPoE will only be in use between your router/s and the ISP and will not come into play on the inside of the LAN.  

MODEM to ROUTER to ROUTER   OR
MODEM TO TWO ROUTERS is what you are going to do.

If you can connect two Routers to that Modem and if the Modem will serve up two Public IPS then your in business.

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Expert Comment

by:calla
ID: 10745923
Unfortunately I'm not sure what kind of DSL modem it is. The management interface was archaic (sp?) requiring script files to control things which I'm not familiar with. The DSL modem only has one port. I will be putting a hub in between the modem and the routers. The ISP requires a userID and password which PPPoE seems to handle. The static config on the Linksys BEFW11S4 doesn't have userID password settings.
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Expert Comment

by:HDWILKINS
ID: 10746236
That router does support PPPoE.

Configure it this way.

Attach the router to the modem with the default settings, put in your Username and Password and it will pick up your Private IP and it will handle PPPoE.  PPPoE is going to give you your IPs which are on the WAN side of the router - and your going to get 192.168.1.x on the LAN side.  (192.158.1.1 for the Gateway, 192.168.1.x for the PCs)

Yes, you can use a hub between the hub and the two routers.  Each should pick up its own IP.  If I understand what you've said in your fist post - this is the way you have one router set up now - and all you should need is another router and the hub.

Am I missing something?
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Expert Comment

by:calla
ID: 10746278
Maybe, I assume the current router using PPPoE is acting as PublicIP1 because the DSL modem is PublicIP1. If so how do the second router know to be PublicIP2? The DSL Modem can't be both. Yes.
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Expert Comment

by:HDWILKINS
ID: 10746365
I assume you can open a web page on the computer attached to the router.

On that computer open a browser and enter 192.168.1.1.  Enter no username and a password of 'admin'.  Go to the STATUS tab and tell me what you see.
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Expert Comment

by:calla
ID: 10746633
I understand all that. Everything is working fine. It's PPPoE connected with PublicIP1. It's more conceptual really about applying the concept of PPPoE to multiple routers or configuring another way. I'm sorry I'm not able to convey my issue more accurately.
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Expert Comment

by:HDWILKINS
ID: 10747793
I think the answer is that you shouldn't worry about it.

The two routers will negotiate PPPoE with the modem.

Think about it this way.  If you just had the modem, a hub and two computers.  The two computers would connect to the modem via the hub and negotiate their IPs.  In your case, the two routers are substituting for the two computers (the modem sees them as two computers).  The routers then use pure Ethernet (no PPPoE) on the Lan side to connect to the computers they serve.

H
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Expert Comment

by:calla
ID: 10748536
Yea. With DHCP from the ISP that would be AOK. I'm using static IP's on thw WAN side. How the heck does router 2 know to get PublicIP2? The last thing I want to do is offend but I think you're underestimating my knowledge base. I fully understand the WAN side /LAN side config,DHCP, port forwarding ...     I just don't understand how the two routers will obtain their respective staic IP's using PPPoE. The first one works, from what I understand, because the DSL modem is set to staic IP 1 so router1 (the only one connected currently) acts as the modems WAN ip.

I'm in the middle of the server load right now. I'll be able to play with it more in a little while. I just want to make sure I get it setup correctly the first time as the location is fairly remote for me.

thanks again for all your help.

adam
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Expert Comment

by:calla
ID: 10748540
Oh and the DSL modem/router is a westelll B90-210014-04
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Accepted Solution

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HDWILKINS earned 500 total points
ID: 10749243
The modem has its own dhcp - limited by a subnet mask which tells it how many IPs it can hand out.
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Expert Comment

by:calla
ID: 10756987
I'm not sure what the problem is here. The routers need static public IP's to host web/email, the servers need static private IP's to receive forwarding from routers. I can breakdown an IP structure like the fastest gunman in the west. I get all that. We are going nowhere. I truly appreciate your help. If there is anything relevant you can add it would still be apreciated but as for now I will be going back to finish this up in a couple weeks. I will give you the points once I get it all figured out for your time and effort but I haven't learned on thing as of yet.
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Expert Comment

by:calla
ID: 11913520
The answer is more simple than I would have expected. Put the DSL modem in passthrough mode. Place a switch behind the DSL modem. Run two routers off the switch. Set them up for NAT. Give one the IP addres #1 and the other with #2 on the WAN side. Each router does it's own port forwarding to the appropiate segment. The ISP has both IP addresses pointed the the MAC of the DSL modem.

That's it.

HDWILKINS gets the points for at least givin' 'er a go.


Moderator:
Sorry for being so tardy.

X gets the square...
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Expert Comment

by:calla
ID: 11913550
Hey learned1 can you give the points to HDWILKINS for me my account had some issues at the time of question creation.

Thanks
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