Using DBMS_LOCK


I have a question using the Oracle built in package DBMS_LOCK. This package is being used
to take out a lock against a lock name.
I was wondering if there is anyway of checking if a lock has been applied without actually
trying to lock the object again. Basically I want to say - here is a lock name, has it
been applied by anyone?
I have tried using some DBA view such as DBMS_LOCK, however,I wanted to use something that
would show information about the name of the lock being used and not just give me process id's.
jpboyAsked:
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musduCommented:
Hi,

you should see lock name in DBMS_LOCK_ALLOCATED table.
0
patilyogeshCommented:
hi..
u can use
this also
DBA_DDL_LOCKS
DBA_DML_LOCKS
and
DBMS_LOCK_ALLOCATED
0
vc01778Commented:
Well,  it's pretty straight-forward:

declare
    l_id   int;
      l_stat int;
begin
  l_id := 123;
  l_stat := dbms_lock.request
             (  id                => l_id,
                lockmode          => dbms_lock.x_mode,
                timeout           => 0,
                release_on_commit => TRUE );
end;


-- the query:

select sid, type, id1 from v$lock where type='UL'

-- result:

8      UL      123

The user lock (UL) has the id of 123.

VC
0
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vc01778Commented:
Despite your unwillingnes to use the request/release pair,  it's more performant than quering a system view:

declare
    l_id   int;
      l_stat int;
begin
  l_id := 123;
  l_stat := dbms_lock.request
             (  id                => l_id,
                lockmode          => dbms_lock.x_mode,
                timeout           => 0,
                release_on_commit => TRUE );
  if l_stat = 1 then
    dbms_output.put_line('Lock has already been taken');
  else
    dbms_output.put_line('The lock is available');
      l_stat := dbms_lock.release(id => l_id);
  end if;
end;
/

VC
0
jpboyAuthor Commented:
I tried using DBMA_LOCK_ALLOCATED, however, this doesnt tell me when the lock will expire or if the calling code is actually still locking the object. The expiration in this table only refers to Oracles perceived time of expiration and not the actua; expiry time.

Is there any way that I can use the lockid in dbms_lock_allocated to find out what time the lock expired or if in fact the lock is still running?
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vc01778Commented:
dbms_lock_allocated has got nothing to do with the fact whether the lock identifier is used or not.  It simply shows whether the identifier was allocated and when it's supposed to expire.

Earlier,  I showed you two ways of how to determine whether the lock has been requested by another session:

1.  Using the v$lock table
2. programmatically by trying to request a lock with a given identifier.

There is simply no other way to do it.
0
vc01778Commented:
dbms_lock_allocated has got nothing to do with the fact whether the lock identifier is used or not.  It simply shows whether the identifier was allocated and when it's supposed to expire.

Earlier,  I showed you two ways of how to determine whether the lock has been requested by another session:

1.  Using the v$lock table
2. programmatically by trying to request a lock with a given identifier.

There is simply no other way to do it.
0

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