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Re-installing XP Pro after motherboard, processor, and memory upgrade

Posted on 2004-04-01
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I never fully recovered from the problems I described in http://www.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/WinXP/Q_20925737.html

Suspecting the problem might be either my old motherboard, BIOS, or memory, I upgraded to a Asus P4C800E, P4 3GHz, and 1 GB of memory.

Now I am trying to rebuild the HAL so that I can boot.

I tried a "Repair" install but still could not get XP to boot.

I have been trying to avoid having to reformat my hard drive and to re-install ALL my programs.

I read extensively in the databases and read about an "UPGRADE" re-install but I don't seem to have that option.

Should I next try a "Clean" install and delete the Windows folder? That way the data on my hard drive will be in tact and will I have to re-install all 200 of my programs.

Suggestions?2
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Question by:hmcook
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CrazyOne earned 500 total points
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although this is about Win2000 the idea is the same.

HOW TO: Perform a Parallel Installation of Windows 2000
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;266465

BEGIN ARTICLE

The information in this article applies to:
Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server
Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional

This article was previously published under 266465
IN THIS TASK
SUMMARY

Performing a Parallel Installation of Windows 2000
REFERENCES
SUMMARY
This article describes how to perform a parallel installation of Windows 2000. Note that you must know your environmental requirements to complete the installation procedure.

Performing a Parallel Installation of Windows 2000

NOTE: The Documents and Settings folder is not overwritten by this procedure.
Boot your computer from the Windows 2000 CD-ROM.
After Setup finishes inspecting the computer's hardware, press ENTER to set up Windows 2000.
Press ESC to install a fresh copy of Windows 2000. If you are installing the same version of Windows, proceed with step 4.
Press ENTER to set up Windows 2000 on the selected item.

NOTE: You can install Windows 2000 on any available partition. If there are problems with your Boot.ini file, you may want to install Windows 2000 on the same partition as the original installation. Your values in the Boot.ini file are the same.
Press ENTER to leave the current file system intact.

IMPORTANT: If you choose to change the file system, you will lose data from the partition to which you are installing.
Press ESC to install Windows 2000 in a different folder.

If you installed the original copy of Windows 2000 in the default Winnt folder, you must type the name of a different folder, and then press ENTER.
After you change the default folder to a different folder, you can proceed with the installation procedure. Select the components and settings that are required for your installation.

REFERENCES
For additional information about how to create the floppy disks, click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

243940 How to Create Windows 2000 Boot Floppy Disks

Last Reviewed: 10/27/2002

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. Copyright 2002 Microsoft Corporation, One Microsoft Way, Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 U.S.A. All rights reserved.
 
END  ARTICLE
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by:hmcook
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Dear CrazyOne,

I have read many of your contributions in the archives.

Should I do the clean install and delete the Windows folder?
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by:CrazyOne
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Do the parallel install. This will let you get to your important files so you can back them up.
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by:hmcook
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Okay, I'm sorry. I see that I need to install to a differenct folder, but what then?

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by:hmcook
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I just found this article in the Knowledge Base: http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;237556

This article was previously published under Q237556
SUMMARY
In Windows 2000 there are several ways to troubleshoot issues related to the Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) that may occur as a result of misdetection, an outdated or non-compliant Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) Basic Input/Output System (BIOS), or an incorrectly or manually installed computer type. This article describes some of the methods you can use to troubleshoot issues related to the HAL.

NOTE: In this article, the term "computer type" and "HAL" have the same meaning, and may be interchanged.
MORE INFORMATION
Determine Your Computer Type
To determine the computer type you are using:
Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click System.
Click the Hardware tab, and then click Device Manager to view what is listed under the Computer branch. The following is the list of supported computer types.

Possible values for the HAL under Standard computers include:
ACPI Multiprocessor PC
ACPI Uniprocessor PC
Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) PC
MPS Multiprocessor PC
MPS Uniprocessor PC
Standard PC

Possible values for the HAL under Compaq include:
Compaq SystemPro Multiprocessor or 100% Compatible

Possible values for the HAL under SGI include:
Silicon Graphics Visual Workstation

View or Change Installed Computer Type
To view or change the installed computer type:

WARNING: Note that you should not attempt to change from an ACPI HAL to a standard HAL or from a standard HAL to a ACPI HAL under any circumstances. Doing so will result in your computer not starting properly or at all. This occurs because the Plug and Play device tree that would be currently loaded is for ACPI, and it does not get reconstructed or revert to a standard HAL Plug and Play device tree. Because of this (the device tree structures being drastically different), the system is unaware of any hardware changes after the computer restarts to include the location of the boot device. Microsoft does not recommend or support this procedure as it will result in data loss.
Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click System.
Click the Hardware tab, and then click Device Manager to view what is listed under the Computer branch. As an example, "Standard PC", the detected computer type Windows 2000 installed on your computer, or an entry such as "Advanced Configuration Power Interface (ACPI) PC" may be listed.
To change the installed computer type, click the Driver tab, and then click Update Drivers.

NOTE: You can only change or update your HAL from Device Manager under Computer Type when changing from a Standard PC HAL to a Standard Multiprocessor PC HAL, because changing from an ACPI HAL to a Standard HAL can result in your not being able to start your computer.
If you are unable to start your computer properly as a result of the wrong computer type (HAL) being installed after Windows 2000 Setup, start the Emergency Repair process:
Start your computer by using the Windows 2000 Setup floppy disks, or with the Windows 2000 CD-ROM if your computer supports starting from a CD-ROM.
At the Welcome to Setup screen, press R to repair.
At the Windows 2000 Repair Options screen, press R to repair using the emergency repair process.
Press M to manually select repair options and ensure that "Verify Windows 2000 system files" and "Inspect startup environment" features are selected, or press F to run all repair options.
Once complete, the originally installed HAL and associated files should be restored. Remove the CD-ROM or floppy disk and then restart your computer.

NOTE: The incorrectly installed computer type is still visible in Device Manager.
To ensure the correct computer type is visible in Device Manager, when you restart your computer, press F8, choose Last Known Good Configuration, and then press ENTER.
Click the appropriate hardware profile (if more than one profile exists). On the hardware profile, click Configuration Recovery, press ENTER, and then permit Windows 2000 to start.
The optimum method to change from an ACPI HAL to a Standard HAL is to re-install Windows 2000 as an upgrade:
Start Windows 2000 Setup as an upgrade.
To automatically disable ACPI support and allow Windows 2000 to detect automatically or manually change and install the correct (Standard HAL) computer type that your computer supports, use either of the following methods:


To Auto detect the computer type:

Press F7 when Setup generates the following informational message:
Press F6 if you need to install a third party SCSI or RAID driver.

NOTE: You do not receive a visual indicator that auto detection is taking place when you press F7; proceed normally with setup until it is completed.

To Manually Select your computer type:

Press F5, and then manually choose the correct Standard computer type by using the following list:
i386 source File Computer Type
*hal.dll Compaq SystemPro Multiprocessor or 100% Compatible
*halapic.dll MPS Uniprocessor PC
*halapic.dll MPS Multiprocessor PC
*hal.dll Standard PC
*halborg.dll SGI mp


NOTE: You do not have to use the reinstallation method to update from a Standard PC HAL to a MPS Multiprocessor PC HAL, you can use the Update Drivers feature in Device Manager for this. However, you must reinstall Windows 2000 when going to an ACPI HAL computer type on a computer that was using the Standard computer type, and then permit Windows 2000 to automatically detect the correct computer type.

If the Emergency Repair process cannot locate your repair information or if the repair information is invalid, recover your Windows 2000 installation by starting the Recovery Console:
Start your computer with the Windows 2000 Setup floppy disks, or with the Windows 2000 CD-ROM if your computer supports starting from CD-ROM. At the Welcome to Setup screen, press R to repair, and then press C to start the Recovery Console.

NOTE: For information about using the Recovery Console, please click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
229716 Description of the Windows 2000 Recovery Console

After you log on to your computer, from the %SystemRoot%\System32 folder of your original Windows 2000 installation, use the command console to copy and rename the following files as noted in the following lists. First determine which HAL and kernel files your computer requires by using the following list of supported computer types:

NOTE: Those marked with an asterisk character are Standard computer types (non-ACPI).

i386 source file: i386\driver.cab\halmacpi.dll
Computer type: ACPI Multiprocessor PC
Copy to this folder: winnt\System32
Rename to this file name: hal.dll

i386 source file: i386\driver.cab\halaacpi.dll
Computer type: ACPI Uniprocessor PC
Copy to this folder: winnt\System32
Rename to this file name: hal.dll

i386 source file: i386\driver.cab\halacpi.dll
Computer type: Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) PC
Copy to this folder: winnt\System32
Rename to this file name: hal.dll

i386 source file: *i386\driver.cab\halsp.dll
Computer type: Compaq SystemPro Multiprocessor or 100% Compatible
Copy to this folder: winnt\System32
Rename to this file name: hal.dll

i386 source file: *i386\driver.cab\halapic.dll
Computer type: MPS Uniprocessor PC
Copy to this folder: winnt\System32
Rename to this file name: hal.dll

i386 source file: *i386\driver.cab\halmps.dll
Computer type: MPS Multiprocessor PC
Copy to this folder: winnt\System32
Rename to this file name: hal.dll

i386 source file: *i386\driver.cab\hal.dll
Computer type: Standard PC
Copy to this folder: winnt\System32
Rename to this file name: hal.dll

i386 source file: *i386\driver.cab\halborg.dll
Computer type: SGI mp
Copy to this folder: winnt\System32
Rename to this file name: hal.dll


As indicated in the following table, copy all the appropriate kernel files common for your system (Uniprocessor vs. Multiprocessor) and the appropriate HAL file based on your computer supported computer type from the Windows 2000 CD-ROM (i386\driver.cab) or installed service pack to the corresponding folder listed in the table under your original Windows 2000 installation, and then rename them (if required) to Ntoskrnl.exe and Hal.dll, respectively.

Common Multiprocessor kernel files Copy to the following directory Rename to the following filename
i386\driver.cab\ntkrnlmp.exe winnt\System32 ntoskrnl.exe
i386\driver.cab\ntkrpamp.exe winnt\System32 ntkrnlpa.exe
i386\driver.cab\kernel32.dll winnt\System32 kernel32.dll
i386\driver.cab\ntdll.dll winnt\System32 ntdll.dll
i386\driver.cab\win32k.sys winnt\System32\drivers win32k.sys
i386\driver.cab\winsrv.dll winnt\System32 winsrv.dll
Common Uniprocessor kernel files Copy to the following directory Rename to the following filename
i386\driver.cab\ntoskrnl.exe winnt\System32 ntoskrnl.exe
i386\driver.cab\ntkrnlpa.exe winnt\System32 ntkrnlpa.exe
i386\driver.cab\kernel32.dll winnt\System32 kernel32.dll
i386\driver.cab\ntdll.dll winnt\System32 ntdll.dll
i386\driver.cab\win32k.sys winnt\System32 win32k.sys
i386\driver.cab\winsrv.dll winnt\System32 winsrv.dll

Expand the Ntdll.dll file from the original Windows 2000 CD-ROM (i386\driver.cab) or installed service pack to the %SystemRoot%\system32 folder of your original Windows 2000 installation.

For example:
drive:\i386\driver.cab /f:ntdll.dll c:\winnt\system32

where drive is the drive letter of your CD-ROM drive containing the Windows 2000 Server CD-ROM.
Expand the Win32k.sys file from the original Windows 2000 CD-ROM (i386\driver.cab) or installed service pack to the %SystemRoot%\system32 folder of your original Windows 2000 installation.
Expand the Kernel32.dll and Winsrv.dll from the Windows 2000 CD-ROM (i386\driver.cab) or installed service pack to the %SystemRoot%\system32 folder of your original Windows 2000 installation. For example, type the following commands expand drive:\i386\driver.cab /F:kernel32.dll %systemroot%\system32\kernel32.dll

expand drive:\i386\driver.cab /F:winsrv.dll %systemroot%\system32\winsrv.dll

where drive is your CD-ROM drive letter.


Restart your computer.
For related information, please click the article number below to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
234558 How to Add Support for Multiple Processors in Windows 2000

WARNING: Windows 2000 displays the list of compatible computer types that can be installed when you use Device Manager to manually update. Doing anything beyond what is listed as compatible is likely to result in not being able to start your computer correctly or at all. If you do have "Advanced Configuration Power Interface (ACPI) PC" listed as your computer type or after updating to the latest ACPI BIOS, then you cannot update to the "ACPI Multiprocessor PC" through Device Manager and may result in not being able to start your computer correctly or at all. In the case of an ACPI HAL, for Windows 2000 to support or recognize both CPUs using an ACPI HAL, you must first update to the latest ACPI BIOS which is fully compliant, then re-install Windows 2000 as an upgrade so it can automatically detect and install ACPI Multiprocessor PC; if it does not, your BIOS in not fully compliant yet.
The information in this article applies to:
Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server
Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional
Last Reviewed: 11/13/2003 (3.0)  
Keywords: kbenv kbhowto KB237556
 
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Author Comment

by:hmcook
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Sorry, again, I am not doing too well today.

This is the article: http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;299340&Product=winxp

This article was previously published under Q299340
SUMMARY
This article describes how to force in a system Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) during an upgrade or installation of Windows XP.

NOTE: When you upgrade from Microsoft Windows 2000 to Windows XP, the HAL is maintained. Because of this, if the Windows 2000 HAL were a Standard PC HAL, that HAL would be loaded for Windows XP. Also, the procedure to change from the Standard PC HAL to the Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) HAL differs from the methods that used in Windows 2000. However, if Setup determines, during an in-place upgrade, that you have and unsupported HAL installed for that system's machine type, and it detects that it is best to officially have another HAL that supports that machine type, it will install the correct HAL. This will change what was previously installed.
MORE INFORMATION
To force in a system Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) during an upgrade or installation of Windows XP, note that during the Text-mode phase of Setup, you receive the following informational message across the bottom of the screen:

Press F6 if you need to install a third-party SCSI or RAID driver.
When this message appears, press F5. You can now make HAL choices by viewing the different options. Note that if you instead press F7, the Standard PC HAL loads, and the ACPI compliance check is bypassed.

After you press F5, you will see the following list of computer types (listed in bold). A brief description of each HAL is included below as a reference.
ACPI Multiprocessor PC: Use for a multiple-processor ACPI computer
ACPI Uniprocessor PC: Use for a ACPI multiple-processor board but with a single processor installed
Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) PC: Use for a single processor motherboard with single processor.
Compaq SystemPro Multiprocessor or 100% Compatible: Use for a Compaq Systempro computer.
MPS Uniprocessor PC: Use on non-ACPI computers dual processor motherboard with a single processor installed
MPS Multiprocessor PC: Non-ACPI computers with a dual processor running
Standard PC: Any Standard PC, non-ACPI, or non-MPS. Could be a 386, 486, Pentium, Pentium II, or Pentium III
Standard PC with C-Step i486
Other
The screen only displays two computers types at a time. You must scroll up using the arrow keys to see the complete list. For additional information about related topics, click the article numbers below to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
237556 Troubleshooting Windows 2000 Hardware Abstraction Layer Issues

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by:hmcook
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Okay, I did a parallel installation and the computer booted but it did not recognize my 160GB secondary hard drive -- one of the suspect hardware problems.
I removed the card it was plugged into and plugged it into the same cable as the primary hard drive. I was then able to get it back. Now, I am copying the entire contents of my C: drive to the secondary one, which will take hours I am afraid.

I am now wondering if the reason my repair install did not work was that the hard drive was plugged into the card.

I plan after the backup to try one more time to see if I can do a repair install to the original Windows folder. If that fails I will be left with no other option than to re-install XP, reformat the hard drive and then start re-install my many programs.

If in the unlikely chance that I succeed I will need advice on removing the parallel installation. If I fail, I will need advice on approaches to re-installing -- where should I begin after Windows and Office? What settings can I safely copy after re-installing?
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by:CrazyOne
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>>>where should I begin after Windows and Office

I usually go with the programs that I know need the most diskspace and most configuration.
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by:CrazyOne
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>>>where should I begin after Windows and Office

I usually go with the programs that I know need the most diskspace and most configuration.
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by:hmcook
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Thanks. I've had some sleep and am less in denial. I'll soon be starting to re-install everything.
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by:CrazyOne
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Good Luck
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