polymorphism

hi guys,

should be easy for you guys...Standard Polymorphism...

Class Shape - Base Class

#ifndef SHAPE_H
#define SHAPE_H

class Shape{

public:
      virtual void read() const = 0;
      virtual void print() const = 0;

};
#endif

Class Circle - Derived Class

#ifndef CIRCLE_H
#define CIRCLE_H

#include "Shape.h"
#include "Point.h"


class Circle:public Shape
{
      Point center;
      double radius;
            
public:

      Circle();
      void setCircle(int x, int y, double r)const;
      int getX()const;
      int getY()const;
      double getRadius()const;
      virtual void read()const;
      virtual void print()const;
};
#endif

Implementation of virtual void read()const

void Circle::read()const
{
      int x;
      int y;
      int rad;
      cout<<"Entering a circle x y radius: ";
      cin>>x;
      cin>>y;
                cin>>rad;
}

Once I have the input form the user, I need to push rad into radius which is a public data member...I can't figure out how to this...It won't let me do this within the function definition because it's a const member function...Also, I would like to set the center of the circle with the use of the Point object center that was defined as public but it gives me errors when I try to do center.setX(x) (setX is a member function of class Point)...Here, I will inlcude the .h and cpp file for the class point...


#ifndef POINT_H
#define POINT_H

#include <iostream>
#include "Shape.h"


class Point
{

int xCoor;
int yCoor;

public:
      
      Point();
      Point(int x, int y);
      void setX(int x);
      void setY(int y);
      int getX()const;
      int getY()const;

};
#endif


#include <iostream>
#include "Point.h"


Point::Point(int x, int y)
{
      xCoor = x;
      yCoor = y;
}

void Point::setX(int x)
{
      xCoor = x;
}

void Point::setY(int y)
{
      yCoor = y;
}

int Point::getX()const
{
      return xCoor;
}

int Point::getY()const
{
      return yCoor;
}

Can anyone help plz??

Thanks ahead

Mike

finalfreakAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
AxterConnect With a Mentor Commented:
>>A const method cannot modify the state of an object.

It can if the data member is mutable.  Although I don't recommend it, it can be done and it's part of the C++ standard.

From the C++ standards:
************************************************************
7.1.1 Storage class specifiers
9.  The mutable specifier on a class data member nullifies a const specifier applied to the containing class
object and permits modification of the mutable class member even though the rest of the object is const
************************************************************
0
 
AxterCommented:
If the function is const, then it can not modify data members unless the data members are mutable
0
 
AxterCommented:
Example:
class Circle:public Shape
{
    Point center;
    mutable double radius;// Declare this variable mutable
0
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Karl Heinz KremerCommented:
A const method cannot modify the state of an object. If you need to modify the object, the method cannot be const. A good example for a const function is getX()- you are only retrieving information from the object, and not modifying it.

Why are you using const for read()?
0
 
AxterCommented:
However, I recommend that you either make your function a non-const function, or that you not modify the variable.

Although declaring a variable mutable allows you to modify it in a const function, it should not be done unless you have a very good reason for by passing the constant logic.
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Karl Heinz KremerCommented:
Axter is right with both that mutable will allow you to modify the variable, but also that you should not do it: If you use a class, and you see that a method is declared as const, you usually don't read the whole implementation of the method (and often you don't even have access to it), and you may miss the fact that one member variable is declared mutable. This means that you rely on the fact that the object does not get modified when you call the method.

In your case, it's pretty obvious that the object will be modified, because that's the whole purpose of the read() method. This means that you are creating a conflict between the expectation of what the method does, and how it's declared.

0
 
Karl Heinz KremerConnect With a Mentor Commented:
I should have written "...should not modify..." I don't like the mutable modifier, and I haven't had a reason to use it in a long time.
0
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