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Generating ranking (ordinal number) field in a query

Posted on 2004-04-01
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Last Modified: 2008-03-17
I need to get a query to generate employee rankings in various categories so I can then add up those rankings to get a total score. I'm using Acess 2000 on Windows 2000. I've tried both solutions provided for the previous question asked like this, but I can't get either of them to work. When I try to use the long solution, I get an "undefined function" error and the VBA debugger highlights the first two lines in the module. The directions say to make sure DAO is ticked in References...there are several "Microsoft DAO *.* Object Library" listings...I've tried them all. When I try to use DAO 3.6, I get a name conflict error. Please help!
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Question by:Fotofixer
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by:bluelizard
ID: 10738389
are the solutions you're mentioning part of an EE question?  if so, please post a link to that question.


--bluelizard
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by:nico5038
ID: 10738545
For setting the references:

Open some VBA code and select Tools/References.
Each libraryname necessary must be checked and (for you: microsoft DAO version x.xx the used version doesn't matter as long it's selected from the list).

Nic;o)
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by:walterecook
ID: 10741018
Yes I'd like to see the code and the previous question you reference.
Nico's right in his helping to check the references.
Some other thoughts:
Are the functions ones that should be inherent (like format() for instance or are you actually referencing a custom function.
Are you trying to call myfunction() for instance, and it can't find it?
Are your functions spelled right?
Say, if you meant format() and you put fomat(), VBA will think it needs a custom function called "fomat" and it will go looking for it.

Walt
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Author Comment

by:Fotofixer
ID: 10741516
This is the question that I referenced the solutions for: I'm not sure how to set it up as a link in here.
Solution Title: Ordinal number in a query
Author: ConsultOR
Both solutions define a custom function. As far as I can tell everything is spelled correctly.
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by:walterecook
ID: 10741739
To link, just copy and paste the URL into the message.
This looks like the one you referenced:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Databases/MS_Access/Q_20589953.html

Maybe you could post your code so we can see ow you implemented it?

Walt
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Accepted Solution

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nico5038 earned 250 total points
ID: 10741775
The question link can be found in the address field from your browser is:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Databases/MS_Access/Q_20589953.html

For ranking check also:
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q208/9/46.ASP

Nic;o)
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Author Comment

by:Fotofixer
ID: 10751738
That did the trick. But there is a problem with the way they wrote the expression on that site. This is the way they wrote it:

Seniority: (Select Count(*) from Employees Where [HireDate] < _
 [Emp1].[HireDate]+1;)

This is the way it should be:

Seniority: (Select Count(*) from Employees Where [HireDate] < [Emp1].[HireDate])+1

The close parenthesis goes in front of the +1

That page has a link to a file that you can download that gives many query examples.

Thanks again
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by:nico5038
ID: 10751823
Hmm, I would have used:
Seniority: (Select Count(*) from Employees Where [HireDate] <= [Emp1].[HireDate])

Thus the equal is automatically counted as 1 and no need for the addition :-)

Success with the application !

Nic;o)
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