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Unix system history log

Posted on 2004-04-02
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Last Modified: 2006-11-17
Hi, all,
  We are using Compaq Thru 64 machine and if we hope to know how many times we restart that machine or when did we restart it in the past 1 month, which log file can give us these information?
  On the other hand, if we hope to know what settngs were changed in the past 1 month, which log info we can clear understand?
  Thanks a lot.
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Question by:chen0426
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liddler earned 252 total points
ID: 10739330
last |grep boot
gives system boot times

Which systems settings do you mean?  Most are held in files in /et/ so an ls -l will give you the modification times on the files
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by:gheist
ID: 10747067
Most likely system was not restarted last month.
uptime command outputs time since last boot.
System reboots are logged into utmp/wtmp files, and best seen with last command.(but you can reboot without logging too...)
If you want to know a bit more about running processes you can enable process accounting by running (as root) /usr/sbin/acct/turnacct on, and looking into turnacct manual page for analysis tools for gathered data.


For file alterations - make a script which copies files you consider holding configurations into shadow subtree, and  then simply run diff utility, which even shows files changed.
For binary config files - extract data in text form or use checksums (no information what has changed then).
Since you write script on your own, you have much flexibility, like mailing/logging script results, reverting config file to previous version(s) with ease etc...
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by:charlie250
charlie250 earned 248 total points
ID: 11020921
There are a number of ways..
1. Add a command to the system startup to append the date /time to a file (making sure the file is in a filesystem that is mounted at the time!)

2. The data is already there if you go looking for it..
You can use (as root)  uerf -R |more and look for event 300

The above will work as long as you don't remove system log information.
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