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Batch File Question

Posted on 2004-04-02
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Last Modified: 2010-04-17
Ok, this is probably an easy answer, but I'm new to scripting so here goes.

I would like to know the answer one or both of the following questions...

1. Is there a way to look for a specific data string in a specific registry key and then create a file based on wether that data string exists?  eg. search the key "HKEY_LOCAL\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings" for data "sp1" in the String Value called MinorVersion.  Then, if (and only if) the data exists, create a reference file called ie6sp1_installed.txt.

or

2. After exporting that key to a text file called Reg_IESettings.txt, search the text file for the string "sp1" and then create a new text file in the same manner as the above question.

I appreciate any help in this area.

Thanks
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Question by:lofiched
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by:Kavar
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several, you specified batch, are you stuck on this (its easier outside of batch)
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by:lofiched
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well, i was going with batch because we don't have a lot of software utilities here, but if there's and easier way, without needing a special program to do it, that's fine.
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by:lofiched
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oh, yeah, and it needs to be able to run from the logon script in an NT environment.
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by:Kavar
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the problem is batch CANNOT read the registry, although you can programmatically dump the registry, windows2000 and above dump in unicode, all the batch text handlers don't handle unicode so well...

You have 2 options,

use a script (like vbscript) which can be used as a logon script

or

use reg.exe (commandline utility from the resource kit)

Let me know which way you want to go down.
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by:lofiched
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well, i guess doing the dump will be fine.  i've already got that portion taken care of using

regedit /e c:\folder\test.txt "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\
CurrentVersion\Internet Settings"

That creates a txt file for me just fine.  

Actually what would be great is if I could search test.txt file for "sp1" and then change the name of that file to reflect the presence of that string.  That way I'm creating more files than what is necessary...not that it really matters that much, but I try to be as efficient as possible.

Hope that helps
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by:lofiched
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sorry, NOT creating more files than necessary
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Kavar earned 100 total points
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after

regedit /e c:\folder\test.txt "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\
CurrentVersion\Internet Settings"

type c:\test.txt | findstr -i "MinorVersion" | findstr -i "sp1">c:\r.txt
for /f %%a in (c:\r.txt) do <whatever you want to do because this machine has sp1>
del c:\r.txt
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by:lofiched
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Thanks, that worked great.  Although I took out the <findstr -i "MinorVersion"> because it was looking for either "MinorVersion" or "SP1".  So if SP1 did not exist it would still create the file because MinorVersion existed.  Anyway, works perfectly now.  Thanks for your help.
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