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Best Html editor

LeDaouk
LeDaouk asked
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Last Modified: 2013-12-16
what is the best HTML editor?
and do u think Office publisher 2003 better front page ? if yes which features are better?
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Commented:
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NotePad

TextPad

Commented:
Publisher? Probably the WORST thing out there. FrontPage 2003 is much better.

Basic rule -- use something that was designed for the medium. Publisher is a PRINT tool, not a WEB one.

But best of all -- learn how it all actually WORKS. There is no substitute for truly understanding what you're doing. That's true for ANY job, not just web work.
Exactly webwoman
stu215Systems Analyst/Project Manager/Programmer
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Commented:
Id agree w  dgelinas that Dreamweaver MX is the best :-D

The Macromedia Studio MX 2004 Suite comes with :
- Dreamweaver MX
- Flash MX
- Freehand MX
- Fireworks MX
- Generator MX
- Coldfusion MX Developer Edition

They offer free trials w there stuff too, dunno what they let you do in em, but it costs quite a bit ...
(Unless you get an educational / non-profit discount or your company is purchasing for you)

Link to Macromedia : http://www.macromedia.com/software/studio/

~Stu :-)

Commented:
Give Nvu a try:  http://www.nvu.com/
Nvu 0.20 binary test builds are now available for Linux and Windows.

http://glazman.org/whyNvu/
http://www.nvu.com/features.html

Nvu is basically a standalone Composer based on Mozilla 1.7, but with a great deal of improvements, such as a tabbed interface and ftp site manager.

You can read about almost daily improvements here:
http://glazman.org/weblog/index.php/Nvu

Commented:
If you want to know your code, I'd go with jaysolomon's suggestion and add Ultra Edit to the list.

If you are wanting to slap something together quick and don't want to know how the page works I'd go with stu215 (not that I am suggesting stu doesn't know his code - I highly respect stu's contributions on EE).

While I administor a Microsoft shop (I'm a network admin as well as web-guy) I would highly recommend staying away from Microsoft products to design web pages.  The code the write is bloated, and forget cross-platform compatibility.  If something your design in Office or Publisher displays well in a non-IE browser it it is by chance, not by design.

bvinson

Commented:
I agree with bvinson on all points.  Ultra Edit is my editor of choice.
I'm not a WYSIWYG fan because, in my opinion, they all tend to either needlessly bloat or encrypt code.  As someone above implied: if you have no intention of learning how to code, a wysiwyg is the way to go.

I use either notepad or GlobalScape's cuteHTML (version 1.0) -- it is unobtrusive and allows me to execute code with different browsers -- I like knowing that any code errors are mine alone.

Vinny

Commented:
I must agree with the others, Dreamweaver MX is the best. But ofcourse good old Notepad is a real life saver too. SO the combination is the ultimate.
In my experience Forntpage is a bit sloppy, but i guess one can survive with it too.

axrial
I completely agree with dgelinas, stu215, and axrial. Dreamweaver is the best out there, pretty unlimited as to what you can do with it. Frontpage is getting better but don't believe it's as powerful as Dreamweaver yet, definitely agree with what stu215 was saying...
stu215Systems Analyst/Project Manager/Programmer
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Commented:
Hehe, I know my code :-P

But Dreamweaver is very nice in that you can toss things together quickly then switch to the code mode (which colors all of your tags nicely & is basically a glorified notepad which auto-completes your tags -- while nice, at times can be annoying) and proceed to do your more advanced code that just cant quite be handled (done nicely) by any graphical interface.

It has very nice object & css libraries that allow you to add components to a page with only a click.

Allows multiple web site management and the ability to change things SITEWIDE as in if you need to change the link to something, instead of going through each page and changing it, you can change it all at once ... or if you rename a page, it will change all the links that reference that page...

If your dealing with other peoples web pages that you have to clean up and modify, Dreamweaver has a code cleanup thing which will remove a lot of garbage tags and make the code more presentable and easier to work with.

Hmm, i think that about sums up a good portion of how dreamweaver actually makes the life of a web-programmer/designer easier....  Those are the main things i use it for...

*** But in the end nothing beats just typing your own code as everyone has pointed out :-)

~Stu :-)

Commented:
notepad is the best for editing html. i have built quite a few html sites and all i ever used was notepad.

Commented:
Yes, notepad is probably the best for you to use, if you want develop your programming skills.. but when someone comes looking for the best software to do something there usually looking for something that can help or do most of the work for them..

which then means "the Best" = Dreamweaver
I use Metapad.
All the blank canvas of notepad but with several useful functions.
(configurbable Macros for commonly used commands)
Wordwrap and several other functions i haven't even begun to use yet.

Dreamweaver MX is nice, but sometimes it makes my head spin.

Commented:
My $.02 = TextPad
Jeez LeDaouk, you grade harder than a college prof:

Last 10 Grades Given: C B B C B A A B B A

Any reason for a grade of 'B' on this?

Commented:
Actually he gave a C
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