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How can I setup the windows 2000 to let all the IWndows xp computer in the net work having same desktop and tool bar

Hi all,

        I have a network running windows 2000 server as the server and 10 windows Xp as the workstation, how can I setup the server to let all the windows xp computer having smae desktop and tool bar?

thanks heaps
yours eric
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ericpc
Asked:
ericpc
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2 Solutions
 
sirbountyCommented:

1) Create romaing user profiles on the server:
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/WindowsServ/2003/datacenter/proddocs/en-us/sag_UP_Add_Profile_Path.asp

>>
Open Active Directory Users and Computers.
In the details section, right-click the applicable user account, and then click Properties.
Click the Profile tab.
In Profile path, type the path information.

 Notes
To perform this procedure, you must be a member of the Account Operators group, Domain Admins group, or the Enterprise Admins group in Active Directory, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority. As a security best practice, consider using Run as to perform this procedure.
To open Active Directory Users and Computers, click Start, click Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Active Directory Users and Computers.
Use a full path in each user account user account

 \\Server\ShareName\UserName

The user profile path location can be on any server. It does not have to be a domain controller. When the user logs on, Windows checks the user's account to see if a user profile path exits. If it does, the user profile is located by the system and copied to the local computer.
To provide better security, user profiles and home folders should be created on an NTFS volume.
The user account can be created in any organizational unit or container within the domain. The default location for the user account is the Users folder.
The Windows Server 2003 family does not support the use of encrypted files within the roaming user profile.
Roaming user profiles that are used with Terminal Services clients are not replicated to the server until the interactive user logs off and the interactive session is closed.


2)Create a mandatory user profile:
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/WindowsServ/2003/datacenter/proddocs/en-us/sag_UP_Add_Profile_Path.asp
Open Active Directory Users and Computers.
In the details section, right-click the applicable user account, and then click Properties.
Click the Profile tab.
In Profile path, type the path information ending with the .man file name extension.

 Notes
To perform this procedure, you must be a member of the Account Operators group, Domain Admins group, or the Enterprise Admins group in Active Directory, or you must have been delegated the appropriate authority. As a security best practice, consider using Run as to perform this procedure.
To open Active Directory Users and Computers, click Start, click Control Panel, click Performance and Maintenance, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Active Directory Users and Computers.
A mandatory user profile is a preconfigured user profile. The user can still modify the desktop, but the changes are not saved when the user logs off. The next time the user logs on, the mandatory user profile is downloaded again. User profiles become mandatory when you rename the NTuser.dat file on the server to NTuser.man. This extension makes the user profile read-only.
Mandatory user profiles do not allow changes to be applied to the user profile stored on the server.
Profile management should be done preferentially by policy. Mandatory profile use, although permitted, is less manageable and more prone to create administration problems, thus it is not recommended.
Use a full path in each user account user account
 
  \\Server\ShareName\UserName

For ShareName, create a Profiles folder if it does not already exist, and share the folder with authenticated users allowing read-only permissions
The shared folder must be created before the user profile can be used.
To provide better security, user profiles and home folders should be created on an NTFS volume.
When creating a mandatory profile, make sure you set the appropriate access permissions for the user or groups of users who will use this profile.
You can also create a mandatory user profile by using Windows Explorer to rename the NTuser.dat file to NTuser.man.
The administrator can assign the same mandatory user profile to as many users as needed

ref:http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/WindowsServ/2003/datacenter/proddocs/en-us/sag_UP_Add_Profile_Path.asp
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ericpcAuthor Commented:
Thanks heaps  sirbounty, I think I need bit of the time to go through with this, can I leave this open for a coupe of days and discuss with you again? i am quite new with this windows 200 server, if you could give me some other suggestion to getting familiar with this quickly, that would be appricate.

yours Eric
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Fatal_ExceptionCommented:
Good morning everyone...   Eric, it is quite difficult to get up to speed on these topics quickly, but we will certainly be here to help you with this..  And don't worry about closing it, just as long as the question is not abandoned....

The first thing you need to do is to determine which of the two profiles above you want to deploy in your network.   Each has it uses, and issues, but primarily it comes down to how much flexibility you wish to allow your users...

For instance, I have users that have 'front desk' types of jobs..  They use the same computer every day.   They do data entry, greet customers, etc, and do not have a good understanding of how computers work, nor do they want to know..   These users I will give a Mandatory Profile..  They see the same desktop every single day that they log in, which really cuts down on TS calls..

The executives are another matter completely, as they want to be able to save a doc to their desktop..  ARGH..!!  but what can we do but allow them to do this..??  And if they travel to another desk and log in, they want to see the same desktop...  They require Roaming Profiles.  

And basically, if you have any users that go from dept to dept, a Roaming Profile will suit them best.  And the great thing about all this, network profile storage, redirected documents, and other tweaks, can all be done via Active Directory.  

Get the picture here..??  Anyway, try them out and if you have a problem, just let us know..

FE
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Fatal_ExceptionCommented:
Just occurred to me that my mention of placing a Doc on the desktop is not a good example..  Mandatory Profiles have more to do with changing your profile settings...

Along with SB's links.. here is another that may help you..

How do I create and assign a mandatory profile in a Windows 2000 domain

http://www.jsiinc.com/subk/tip5400/rh5450.htm

How do I create a roaming user profile in a Windows 2000 domain

http://www.jsiinc.com/subh/tip3800/rh3848.htm

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ericpcAuthor Commented:
extremely helpful, thanks a lot, i will try thwm out and then come back

yours eric
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Fatal_ExceptionCommented:
Thanks..

FE
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