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Connect two Windows XP computers through the Internet

Posted on 2004-04-04
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I am trying to connect a Windows XP box (Computer_1) to another Windows XP box (Computer_2) through the internet.

I have to get my computer talking through my Cable line to my friends DSL.  We both have a Linksys router.  Is this possible with Windows XP Pro?  Is there an inherent VPN type solution to XP?

How would I do this?
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Question by:bfisher666
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by:CrazyOne
ID: 10754973
Enabling Remote Desktop for Internet Use
http://www.winxpnews.com/?id=72

Remote Desktop can be an absolute life saver when you're on the road. We were stuck in a hotel with a wireless network that didn't allow outbound VPN connections, but they did allow outbound Remote Desktop connections. I was able to connect to my Windows XP desktop, access my files, and work just as if I was at home. It's great! However, you need to enable Remote Desktop on your home computer before you leave, and then configure your Internet Router to support connections through the Internet. Here are some tips and tricks:

The first thing you need to do is enable Remote Desktop connections to your PC. Click Start and then right click My Computer. Click the Properties command.
Click on the Remote tab in the System Properties dialog box.
On the Remote tab, put a checkmark in the Allow users to connect remotely to this computer checkbox. You may see a dialog box warning you that some accounts do not have passwords and that only accounts with passwords will be able to connect. Click OK to close the dialog box.
Click on the Select Remote Users button. Note that the Administrator account already has access, and that any member of the Administrators group can connect, even if you don't manually add them. Click the Add button. Type in the name of the user account you want to use to access the Remote Desktop, then click the Check Names button to make sure you typed it in correctly. Click OK after adding the name.
Click OK in the Remote Desktop Users dialog box.
Click Apply and then click OK in the System Properties dialog box.
The last step is the trickiest, because the steps are different depending on what type of "router" you use to connect to the Internet. What you need to do is configure your "router" (it's actually a NAT server in most cases, rather than a true router) to allow incoming Remote Desktop connections to the external IP address of the router to be forwarded (sent to) the IP address of your Remote Desktop Windows XP computer. The "router" or NAT server needs to pass all incoming connections to TCP Port 3389 to your Windows XP computer. The challenge is getting your Internet connection device to pass the Remote Desktop connections to your computer. Also, make sure you have a strong password on your computer, as it's exposed to the Internet.
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by:CrazyOne
ID: 10754977
How to Use the Remote Desktop Feature of Windows XP Professional
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;315328

HOW TO: Gain Access to Local Files by Using a Remote Desktop Connection in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;313292

How to Manage Remote Access to the Registry
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;314837

The Point-to-Point Protocol Dial-Up Sequence
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;315253
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Author Comment

by:bfisher666
ID: 10754984
RDP is not the solution I want.  We need to be able to access each pc simutaneously.
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Expert Comment

by:chibi-momo
ID: 10755018
OK, then try VPN:

HOW TO: Configure a Connection to a Virtual Private Network (VPN) in Windows XP:
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;314076&Product=winxp

Chibi
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Author Comment

by:bfisher666
ID: 10755026
OK but do I need a third party software or can WinXP pro call and answer a VPN call?
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Expert Comment

by:chibi-momo
ID: 10755046
Oops, I guess XP doesn't have a VPN server service, does it?
If that's the case, you can use realVPN (free):

http://www.realvnc.com

or PCanywhere (not free):
http://enterprisesecurity.symantec.com/products/products.cfm?ProductID=2

But then I think they are the same thing as Remote Desktop... what kind of transaction you are planning to do anyway?

Chibi

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Author Comment

by:bfisher666
ID: 10755055
I want to be able to share files on my computer with him and vice-versa but also for one-on-one gaming
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by:CrazyOne
ID: 10755080
You can I believe do that with any of the instnat messengers Like Yahoo, AIM, MSN Messenger etc.
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by:chaaser
ID: 10755389
You might try openVPN: http://openvpn.sourceforgenet/

It installs a virtual NIC in each PC; you just configure the vpn, give the two virtual NICs IPs in the same subnet, set up the routing and have a VPN ready.
I've setup my windows VPN using this and it's been running rock stable for months. There is a windows installer and a very comprehensive windows howto on the site.

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DanniF earned 500 total points
ID: 10755448
I beg to differ.

Windows XP DOES have a VPN server functionality.

Here's how to set it up:

http://asia.cnet.com/itmanager/netadmin/0,39006400,39050037,00.htm


Hope this helps,

Daniel F.
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Expert Comment

by:chibi-momo
ID: 10763338
Oh, this is great; I didn't think XP had this functionality.
Thanks Daniel F.

Chibi
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Author Comment

by:bfisher666
ID: 10763423
just a heads up the article says you need two nics but I was able to get it to work with my router and one nic.  I just port forwarded 1723 to my desktop's ip.  Most routers allow GRE through so PPTP wasn't an issue.

Thanks to you all again!
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Expert Comment

by:mojopojo
ID: 10900795
Someone please answer me this: I run XP Pro at work, home and another location that I wish to establish a VPR to. My home and 3rd location conect via a Cable Modem to my ISP (Comcast). So, how can I create the needed VPNs using the DHCP addressing servise that my ISP provides??  If I don't have a static IP address at the other locationes (as well as on my office LAN) how do I create the VPN?

Is this something that I need to talk to my ISP about?

Is it their router (at my house) that I have to address my conection to?

What's the story? I have to access these PCs from eachother a securly as possible. Remote desktop is not what I'm looking for.

Thanks...
 
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Author Comment

by:bfisher666
ID: 10901484
I signed up with DynDNS.org it was free BUT the software to keep your IP updated was like $15 - $20 bucks
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Expert Comment

by:Scouser007
ID: 10932003
Your ISP can give you  a static IP at a charge.  Without a server you can only use one VPN at a time on an XP PC.  The router has to have port fowarding, 1723 to the LAN ip of the PC receiving the VPN, and also have a PPTP passthrough enabled (protocol 47).

Outside of that read the link posted above:
http://asia.cnet.com/itmanager/netadmin/0,39006400,39050037,00.htm

These guys have answered everthing you need to know, your problem is getting it to work!
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Expert Comment

by:brandsmith
ID: 10960607
should have looked to see if your linksys has vpn protocals in it
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Expert Comment

by:Scouser007
ID: 10962456
BEFSR41, BEFVP41, and the other BEF??41 all have the ability to select pass through fro the PPTP (protcol 47).  However good luck getting anything to work behind it!  I had a major problem trying to get a VPN working through a linksys, seems like the best way is to use the router as the end point.  That means you need a VPN router, or connect your PC directly to your modem/dsl.
Also if you do a search on here the is a link to an FTP site that has the onld versions of SSH sentinel (VPN software), it now cost money and is called something different.  I am suggesting the sentinel program because I THINK it can do what windows can not.  That is to connect a client to a host PC behind a router.  I managed to get the VPN inside my network and then back out but the remote client would not authenticate, apparently a windows issue.  The problem is the client sends a signal A, A gets to the router and is converted to B, B is then fowarded to the internal PC and turned into C, C goes to the router and is sent back the the client.  The client expects to see B, but gets sent C, it says F you and does not autheticate the VPN.
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Expert Comment

by:Scouser007
ID: 10962469
Ouppps, back to the point I think the sentinel program will read signal C on the cients PC, where windows will not
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