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Conditional compilation: I want to compile functions on the basis of knowing or not knowing the type of the parameter value (without using /d or /define). Like #ifdef __XYZ_H__ in C++...

Posted on 2004-04-05
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Last Modified: 2011-09-20
I'd like to build a class (Abc) that is shared between C# projects on source code basis. Some of these projects know a particular class (Xyz), some don't.
So when I make a function like Abc.DoSomething(Xyz xyz), it would result in a compile time error in the projects where Xyz is not known. How can I make source code that is only compiled when Xyz is known?
#define works only within the same source file and I'd like to avoid others to need more than including the source file of Abc to their project.

regards, Flea
(Don't beat me, if my English is too poor for you.)

P.S.: At least, there would be the possibility to make a #if ... #warning section...
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Question by:Fleasoft
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TheAvenger earned 400 total points
ID: 10755423
In C# you can include #ifs only for terms defined with #define or in the properties of the project. You cannot check the existance of a type declaration. So I would put an #if in the code and I would define the term in the project properties (Project->Properties->Configuration Properties->Build->Conditional Compilation Constants - should be added for both debug and release configuration). Then in the projects you include the type, you will define the term. For the projects where you don't define the type, you will not define the term.
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by:Fleasoft
ID: 10755653
Okay, the solution of TheAvenger (thanks for contribution) was still known to me but I've searched for an easier to apply solution (see the sentence beginning with #define), where the programmer sharing the code file to his/her project has little effort to do. So perhaps there's a way to automatically add the define to project properties?
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by:TheAvenger
ID: 10755660
I don't think so :-(( Unforutnately the preprocessor of C# is not so powerful as it is in C++....
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by:Fleasoft
ID: 10755951
Unfortunately I'm afraid I'll have to agree you :-(( They should have been thought on something like that.
Thanks anyway...

regards, Flea
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by:AdrianJMartin
ID: 10756036
As TheAvenger points out all the developer has to do is add the def to the "Conditional Compilation Section" in the projects properties...... it difficult to see how much easier it could be...
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