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3d Distance array

Posted on 2004-04-05
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Last Modified: 2010-04-01
can any one provide a simplistic code for a 3d array?  This is for homework.  This what I have so far.

void input_fun(Point &, &);
double calculate_fun(Point, Point);
void print_fun(double distance);

struct Point {

      double x;
      double y;
      double z;

};

      Point p1, p2;      

      double distance;

      input_fun(p1, p2);
      distance = calculate_fun(p_array);
      print_fun(distance);

      return 0;

}

void input_fun(Point &p1, &p2) {

      cin >> p1.x >> p1.y >> p1.z;
      cin >> p2.x >> p2.y >> p2C.z;
}

double calculate_fun(Point p1, Point p2) {

      double distance;
      
      distance = sqrt(p1.x -p2.x....

      return distance;

}

void print_fun(double distance) {

      cout << "distance = " << distance << endl;

}

I am looking for the modified working code.  This is for a homework assignment.  CMPS 222
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Question by:edelossantos
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Accepted Solution

by:
PerryDK earned 500 total points
ID: 10763005
Looks like your having trouble with the distance formula for two 3d points.

Distance formula for 2d points is sqrt( (x1 - x2)^2 + (y1 - y2)^2 )

You can extend this for 3d points simply by sqrt( (x1 - x2)^2 + (y1 - y2)^2  + (z1 - z2)^2 )

Your other problem was with arrays.  if you know the size of your array you can use
Point myArray[10];

In the case of the below program the size of the array is not known until runtime which means we need to dynamically allocate our array such as this.

int numPoints;
cin >> numPoints;

Point* ptrArray = new Point[numPoints];

When doing this you must be sure to delete any memory that you allocate at run time with the usuage of the delete operator. like
delete[] ptrArray;

Below I have provided a sample output and program that produces the output.  This probably isn't exactly what your teacher wants so I wouldn't just hand it in.  Read carefully what your instructor is asking for and provide exactly that.

******BEGIN OUTPUT*******
How many points do you want to enter?  3

Enter the values for point 1.  0 0 0

Enter the values for point 2.  1 1 1

Enter the values for point 3.  5 0 0


The points you have entered are
Point 1 = (0, 0, 0)
Point 2 = (1, 1, 1)
Point 3 = (5, 0, 0)

Enter the numbers of the points you want to calculate the distance of.
(Note: enter 0 if you want to quit)
1 2

The distance between the point (0, 0, 0) and the point (1, 1, 1) is 1.73205

Enter the numbers of the points you want to calculate the distance of.
(Note: enter 0 if you want to quit)
1 3

The distance between the point (0, 0, 0) and the point (5, 0, 0) is 5

Enter the numbers of the points you want to calculate the distance of.
(Note: enter 0 if you want to quit)
0

******END OUTPUT*******


The actual program

#include <iostream.h>
#include <math.h>

struct Point {

     double x;
     double y;
     double z;

};


void inputPoint(Point &p)
{
  cin >> p.x >> p.y >> p.z;
}

void outputPoint(const Point& p)
{
  cout << "(" << p.x << ", " << p.y << ", " << p.z << ")";
}

double getDistance(const Point& p1, const Point& p2)
{
  double distance;

  distance =
      sqrt(   (p1.x - p2.x) * (p1.x - p2.x)
            + (p1.y - p2.y) * (p1.y - p2.y)
            + (p1.z - p2.z) * (p1.z - p2.z)
           );

  return distance;
}

void outputDistanceBetween(const Point& p1, const Point& p2)
{
  cout << "The distance between the point ";
  outputPoint(p1);
  cout << " and the point ";
  outputPoint(p2);
  cout << " is " << getDistance(p1, p2) << endl;
}

void inputPointsForDistanceComparison(int& point1Index, int& point2Index)
{
  cout << endl;
  cout << "Enter the numbers of the points you want to calculate the distance of." << endl
       << "(Note: enter 0 if you want to quit)" << endl;
  cin >> point1Index;
  cin >> point2Index;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  cout << "How many points do you want to enter?  ";
  int numPoints;
  cin >> numPoints;

  Point* ptrPoints = new Point[numPoints];
  for(int i = 0; i < numPoints; i++)
  {
    cout << endl << "Enter the values for point " << i + 1 << ".  ";
    inputPoint(ptrPoints[i]);
  }

  cout << endl << endl << "The points you have entered are " << endl;
  for(int i = 0; i < numPoints; i++)
  {
    cout << "Point " << i + 1 << " = ";
    outputPoint(ptrPoints[i]);
    cout << endl;
  }

  int point1Index, point2Index;
  inputPointsForDistanceComparison(point1Index, point2Index);

  while(point1Index != 0)
  {
    cout << endl;

    //validate the indexes;
    if(point2Index <= 0 || point2Index > numPoints)
    {
      cout << "Point " << point2Index << " is not a valid point " << endl;
      inputPointsForDistanceComparison(point1Index, point2Index);
      continue;
    }

    //set the proper indexes
    point1Index--;
    point2Index--;
    //this was done because we listed the points 1, 2, 3, ... num points

    outputDistanceBetween(ptrPoints[point1Index], ptrPoints[point2Index]);

    inputPointsForDistanceComparison(point1Index, point2Index);
  }

  //finally remebmer to delete the memory we allocated
  delete[] ptrPoints;

  return 0;

}
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