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Changing a Win2K to native mode - what happens to notebooks?

I'm considering changing my Win2k domain to native mode, as all NT4 domain controllers have been upgraded to Win2K. My one major concern in doing this is our notebook users.

It is my understanding that once changed to native mode, as domain user must be able to connect to a Global Catalogue server to be authenticated and to logon to the PC. Does this mean that when someone who uses a laptop at work and home will have to use a local user account when not connected to the network? Currently notebook users use their domain credentials to logon if they are connected or disconnected from the domain network.

I would prefer for our mobile users to be able to used a cached copy of their credentials as is currently possible. I don't want user's to have to maintain two user profiles on their laptops. Can anyone pose a suitable solution?
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gootmundi
Asked:
gootmundi
2 Solutions
 
oBdACommented:
No need to worry, logging on with cached credentials will still work.
Global Catalog Server Requirement for User and Computer Logon
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=216970
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jamesreddyCommented:
oBdA is correct.  If there is no active network connection, the laptop will attempt to log in using cached creentials automatically.  If, for some reason, you run into a problem, just install a server in every user's home with a Global Catalog installed and that should fix the problem.  =)  Sorry...little joke.

Really...no need to worry.  I run a network with about 50 laptops and none of the users have ever had a problem logging in.  Just make sure that you do not have used cahced credentials disabled in group policies.
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flashheartCommented:
Yep, if you would like a third person to confirm this, I am confirming this too! :o)
Cached credentials are the key
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