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HWINFO equiv in FreeBSD

Posted on 2004-04-06
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I've just started a new admin job and there are a few FreeBSD boxes in the network that no one knows what they are.. is there a equivilant of hwinfo in FreeBSD?

Thanks
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Question by:cmtutz
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roddie earned 250 total points
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dmesg will show you what the kernel detects on boot-up, and is usually a good source of info.  If dmesg is full with something else (kernel messages), than you can check the dmesg.* files in /var/log

You can also use pciconf to list IRQ usage, and get some more details.

Good luck!

Roddie
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by:kolyakarpov
ID: 10977822
If dmesg is totally unaviable you can check sysctl (not verbose as dmesg):

> sysctl -a hw

:)))
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