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I want to reboot "office computer" from my home.

I have pcAnywhere running on my office and home computers.  Sometimes pcAnywhere  freezes up and I need to reboot my office computer.  (Currently, I call in and have someone walk into my office and power off/power on the computer).

My office computer is on a Domain Controller network running Windows 2000 Server.

I can VPN into the office SERVER (that is running Windows 2000 Server) successfully.

Is there a way I can create a "program/batch" file on the SERVER, that, when executed, will reboot my office computer?

Thanks for your help.

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jimdorman
Asked:
jimdorman
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2 Solutions
 
ewallCommented:
The Resource Kit Tools for the NT/2000/XP operating systems contain an executable called SHUTDOWN.EXE that allow you to force a shutdown or reboot across the network (if you have admin-level privileges on the target PC). If your office PC is one of those and your login has local admin privs, then this is a go. I'm searching for the download links now...
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jimdormanAuthor Commented:
I did a search.

I found c:\winnt\system32\shutdown.exe
and c:\winnt\system32\dllcache\shutdown.exe

Is this what I need?  I have domain admin priviledges.
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ewallCommented:
Oh, and I just remembered that XP and Windows Server 2003 both include SHUTDOWN.EXE by default... Just type "shutdown /?" inside a command prompt to get the syntax. You'll probably want to do something like "shutdown -r -f -t 5 -m \\your_pc_name"

Or, if you've got NT 4.0, here's the link to download the Resource Kit Tools for NT 4.0 (_only_): http://download.microsoft.com/download/winntsrv40/rktools/1.0/NT4/EN-US/sp4rk_i386.Exe

~ewall
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ewallCommented:
Yes, that should do it... But you're going to need that program on your _server_ that you're logging into, so you can run it there to send the reboot message across the network to your PC.

So check if the server's got a SHUTDOWN.EXE file, or copy the one from your c:\winnt\system32\ folder to the server. Then decide on your parameters (/? to get the list) and try it out...

Hope that helps! ~ewall
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jimdormanAuthor Commented:
The shutdown.exe program is located in c:\winnt\system32
and in a "Shutdown" folder on the Server.

I successfully VPN'ed into the Server

I received the following error message:
Universal naming conventions paths are not supported
after I typed the following line:

\\ServerComputer\ShareName\Shutdown\ShutdownComputer.bat

What is the problem.  I am running Windows XP Pro on my home computer.

The ShutdownComputer batch file contains the following:
shutdown.exe -r -f -m \\KG01



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jimdormanAuthor Commented:
What should the batch file "say"?
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ewallCommented:
Actually, it's not the batch file that's causing the problem here, it's the command calling it...

...which makes me think, if you're VPN'ed into the network, you might be able to run the command from your PC. (So nevermind that stuff about having the shutdown command on the server; I think I had a brainfart there.) Er, so if you have the batch file on your home PC, try running it from there... It might ask for authentication (if the username/password you use at home is different than what you use at work, most likely; you could even add this authentication to the batch file in the line before the shutdown command, if you want to make it easier).

Sorry for the confusion; it's been a long day... ~ewall
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Rich RumbleSecurity SamuraiCommented:
Type "shutdown.exe" on your run line, a GUI should pop up, you just need to fill in the blanks, \\computer  place check marks for force programs to close and save, start the countdown at 30 seconds... or 1 second. As long as you can get to the computer at your office, which will probably mean being connected to the VPN (virtual private network)
Once VPN'd in you can either issue the shutdown remotely, or VNC (virtual network computer) or TS (terminal service) into the computer, and go to start shutdown as Ewall has said. I think VPN and VNC may have been confused, as the two are not alike in function, but are in initials :)

If you had a PC that was powered off, and you needed it rebooted, you'd need a NIC in the computer  that needs to be started that can listen for "wake-on lan" instructions. Then you'd need to issue the wake-on lan to that PC (by mac address typically)  But it's much easier if you VNC/TS into one and go to start.
-rich
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trywaredkCommented:
To run a batch-file you can't use UNC-path \\ServerComputer\ShareName\

You have to map a drive to \\ServerComputer\ShareName\

NET USE X: \\ServerComputer\ShareName Persistent:no

Then run your batch-file X:\Shutdown\ShutdownComputer.bat

Many Regards
Jorgen Malmgren
IT-Supervisor
Denmark

:o) Your brain is like a parachute. It works best when it's open
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trywaredkCommented:
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JamesDSCommented:
Actually if you're VPN'd in you can run shutdown.EXE locally and give it the UNC path of your server. If there is a problem with name resolution, you may have to use the IP address of your server instead

Cheers

JamesDS
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jimdormanAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your help.
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