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Connecting Wireless Access Point to Existing Network

I have an existing network that is using the 192.168.123.x address range.

I have attached a Linksys Wireless - G (WRT54G) router as an "Access Point" to the network.

Is there a way for the Linksys Router to extend the existing network addresses and have access to the network?

I have so far been unsuccesful getting this to work.

I can get a connection to the internet, but have no access to the existing network addresses.

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mmcinally
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mmcinally
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1 Solution
 
Gareth GudgerCommented:
Hmm. Well, you would be much easier with a straight access point.

You can plug the cable into one of the numbered ports as opposed to the WAN port. That way the wireless clients and rest of the network aren't on two different ends of a firewall and NAT. If you do this you will want to turn off DHCP on the router.

I think that will work.
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dm_osbornCommented:
I agree with diggisaur. Don't use the WAN port. Uplink your network to the hub on the Linksys. The hub and the wireless are on the same side of the router. I assume that you are providing internet access through your network, not the router.

You can let your network's DHCP give your router it's IP info or, if your like me and want your addressing allocations to look pretty, set it statically.  
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mmcinallyAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the help.

It is amazing that tech support at Linksys wouldn't even mention that.  I poured over documentation, and nothing seems to mention that is what needs to be done to use the router as a hub.  I had set all of the settings properly: turned off DHCP, allowed the router to communicate with other routers, etc.  But nowhere did I find that I was simply plugged into the WAN port.

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Gareth GudgerCommented:
Yea, I think tech support didnt recommend it because it is kind of "jerry-rigged".
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mmcinallyAuthor Commented:

If that is jerry-rigged then is there a "proper" way to set that up?

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Gareth GudgerCommented:
No not at all..... I meant it in more of an unorthodox use of the products design. For your particular implementation Linksys techs would have expected and supported just a straight wireless access point. The router is designed to be the gateway to the internet.
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