type casting



i don't understand internally what happen when type cast occur.
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RajesAsked:
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sunnycoderConnect With a Mentor Commented:
int * p;

given this declaration, your compiler expects that p will hold address of a pointer ... now if you declare a struct

struct my_struct
{
     int a;
}my;

and try the statement p = &my; - compiler will generate an error because compiler expects p to hold address for an int and not some struct ... Now if you really want to hold address of "my" in p, then you need a typecast

p = (int *)(&my);  .... this will force the compiler to treat the address of my as address of an int ... this is just a way of reassuring the compiler that you know what you are doing (since the cast is explicit) and the assignment is not in error.

While typecasting has its own uses, the implications of abusing typecasting are many and most likely you will get a hard to debug and hard to maintain code ... Pointer artihmetic and data dereferencing are the most common victims
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sunnycoderCommented:
Hi Rajes,

When a typecast occurs , the system treats one type of data as the casted type ..

e.g. if you say char a='A'; ... then memory location denoted by a holds a bit pattern corresponding to character 'A'

when you cast it to some other type, say int ... the same bit pattern will be interpreted as an int and not as a character ...

Sunnycoder
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RajesAuthor Commented:

thanks for your reply.then please tell me typecasting as the basic from pointer manipulation.
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avizitCommented:
from a pointer point of view.

given any pointer ptr , ++ptr will increment the ptr by sizeof the object pointed by the pointer

if you cast it to another type , ++ptr will increment by the size of the casted type

and which in some cases can lead to some not so easily debuggable code.


--Abhijit


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