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  • Status: Solved
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Function to compare wildcarded hostnames

Does anybody know of a function (or feels like writing one) that can compare a host name to a wildcarded specification, for example:

*.company.com should match a.company.com but not company.com
*any.com should match company.com or a.company.com but not company1.com
*any*.com should match a.company1.com
*boston*.*any*.com should match 23boston.company1.com

etc.

The wildcarding doesn't need to be more extensive than *, that is, no [1..9] or aything like that is required.

Regular expressions might do the trick although the overhead seems high for something so simple, and I'd like this to be as light-weight as possible.
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wayside
Asked:
wayside
  • 2
2 Solutions
 
jkrCommented:
If you are on windows, check 'PathMatchSpec()' (http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/shellcc/platform/shell/reference/shlwapi/path/pathmatchspec.asp) - it seems to match your criteria (no pun intended :o)
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itsmeandnobodyelseCommented:
Try this, i adopted it from my own string class to std::string

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

// @mfunc compare with wildcard string
bool compareWildcard(const string& str, const string& mask)
{
    int     i1   = 0;
    int     i2   = 0;
    int     len1 = str.length();
    int     len2 = mask.length();
    string  next;
    char    c1, c2;

    while (i1 < len1 && i2 < len2)
    {
        c1 = str[i1];
        c2 = mask[i2];
        switch (c2)
        {
        case '*':
           
            while (++i2 < len2 && ((c2 = mask[i2]) == '?' || c2 == '*'))
            {
                if (c2 == '*')
                    continue;
                if (++i1 == len1)
                    return false;
                c1 = str[i1];
            }
            if (i2 >= len2)
                return true;

            while ((i1 = str.find(c2, i1)) != string::npos)
            {
                next = str.substr(i1);
                if (compareWildcard(next, mask.substr(i2)))
                    return true;
                i1++;
            }
            return false;
        case '?':
            break;
        default:
            if (c1 != c2)
                return false;
        }
        if (++i1 == len1)
        {
            if (++i2 == len2)
                return true;
            next = mask.substr(i2);
                  int pos;
                  while ((pos = next.find('*')) != string::npos)
                 next.erase(pos, 1);
            return next.empty();
        }
        if (++i2 == len2)
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}


void main(int narg, char* pszArgs[])
{
    if (narg  != 3)
        return;
    string str = pszArgs[1];
    string msk = pszArgs[2];
    if (compareWildcard(str, msk))
        cout << str << " matches " << msk << endl;
    else
        cout << str << " doesn't match " << msk << endl;

}

Regards, Alex


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waysideAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the replies, I will check both of these out.
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waysideAuthor Commented:
jkr - PathMatchSpec() seems to work for every test case I've given it. Thanks for letting me know about it, I had never come across that one before.

Alex - that's a nifty function, thanks. I've squirrelled it away in case I ever need to port to another platform.
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