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Linux noob crashes his X...

I have a Redhat 9 VMware install, when I tried to add more disk space I can no longer startx.  It tries to load the login screen but then crashes back to command, over and over.  I didn't see a way to increase the size of the existing virtual disk (would like to know if possible) so I tried adding a second virtual disk.  What do I need to do now?  I'm just learning, step by step would be much appreciated, thanks.
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Popeyediceclay
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Popeyediceclay
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1 Solution
 
jlevieCommented:
What, exactly, did you do in the process of adding a second virtual disk?
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PopeyediceclayAuthor Commented:
Just that, from VMware all I had to do was pick a size and make it available.  I figured once I booted it up i would be able to format it and mount it.  The problem with X-Windows turned out to be a disply issue, I reinstalled the tools and now it's fine.
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jlevieCommented:
Right, just adding a virutal disk to VMware wouldn't have anything to do with the X problem. I was concerned that you might have already mounted the disk on Linux and moved some stuff to it, which if not done properly has the potential to mess up X if the move affects /tmp. /usr, or /home.
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PopeyediceclayAuthor Commented:
So what do I do with the disk now?  I imagine I need to mount and format sdb to some directory in the root?
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jlevieCommented:
At the moment it is just a raw disk as far as Linux is concerned. You'll need to use fdisk to create one or more partitions on the disk, and then use mke2fs to create a file system on the new partition(s). When that's complete you create a mount point (mkdir /mount-point) and mount it.
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PopeyediceclayAuthor Commented:
Cool, I got it.  Lastly, can I make Redhat automount this at startup?  I added this line to fstab:

/dev/sdb                     /data

Will that work or did I just set it up to crash?
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jlevieCommented:
That entry isn't complete and should look like:

/dev/sdb1           /data          ext3   defaults     1 2

assuming that you've made an ext3 file system on the first partition.
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PopeyediceclayAuthor Commented:
I assume I made it ext3 too :) , thanks
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