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Zones in DNS

Posted on 2004-04-09
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I am currently working through a DNS book and reading the chapter about configuring a zone through the Configure DNS server Wzard. I'm ok about Forward and Reverse lookup zones. What I'm not sure about are the zone(s) themselves. Do I need to set-up at least one zone, does it depend on how I want my home network to develop, does it matter what I call them as long as they end in .com? Are they essential if I want to install Active Directory, which I still want to do?

I don't want to rush through all this in case I encounter problems later. Books tend to show you what you can do and not always why you would need to!

Peter
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Question by:Peter_Fabri
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sunnycoder earned 250 total points
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Hi Peter_Fabri,

> What I'm not sure about are the zone(s) themselves.
On a network as vast as the Internet it would be impractical to identify each system solely by its numeric IP address. To give humans something better to work with, there is the Domain Name System. i.e. you get to work with names instead of numbers. An obvious problem is you and I want to use the same name and put up our sites with the same name ... how does a user resolve the destination site ? ... So we need a centralized place where we can register and get domain names ....

Now suppose you get a domain name, www.peter_fabri.com .... you can start several subsites like me.peter_fabri.com , you.peter_fabri.com ... Note that all of these can be unambiguously resolved ... all fall under peter_fabri.com and there is only one peter_fabri.com !! Anything under peter_fabri.com subtree in DNS will be forwarded tou your servers for resolution

This is a zone. The zone is a subtree of the DNS that is administered separately. The zone is a subtree of the DNS that is administered separately. A common zone is a second-level domain, "peter_fabri.com" for example. Thus a lot of second-level domains divide their zone into smaller zones.

>Do I need to set-up at least one zone,
Well, if you want outside world to access it, then yes

> does it depend on how I want my home network to develop,
as I said, division into subzones depends on how you want it !! e.g. a univ would typically give a subzone to each of is departments cs.univ.edu or ee.univ.edu ... how a department handles its subzone is left upto it

>does it matter what I call them as long as they end in .com?
Yes ... what you call it will depend on what is searched and found as ... there are several other generic domains other than .com ... e.g. .gov, .net, .edu

this link should help
http://www.sedo.co.uk/links/showhtml.php3?Id=43&language=e

Sunnycoder
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by:Peter_Fabri
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Ok That's fine. I am not going to register my domain name though, I simply want to practice network administgration on my server/workstation.

So, when the Wizard ask for a name for my (first) new zone, I can write Peter_Fabri.com. From your advice above, I can go through the same procedure and attach as many prefixes as I want? Sorry If this sounds like I haven't understood, but I do want to get things absolutely clear in my own mind.

Thereafter I need to setup Forward & Reverse lookup znes for each subdomain, but I notice that the network ID seems incomplete, ie 192.168.100. This just seems starnge to me but must work as it's part of the OS!

Peter
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by:Nyaema
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It is essential to understand name resolution and the need for DNS servers.

DNS servers basically take a full qualified domain name and resolve it to an IP address or vice versa.

When configuring TCP/IP on a computer you want to add to a network, youhave the opportunity to choose the DNS server you want to use for name resolution.

So to answer your question.  In a lab situation, you can give your zones any FQDN you want, and it does not have to end in .com.

DNS is a tree based design.  And in the design, you begin with a root domain and then branch out to domains, sub-domain and hosts.

So .com is a root domain, so is .net and .org etc.
In the lab your root domain can be any name you want

To distinquish public and private domains, the standard practice is to use .local root domain in your network.  This enable you to use forwarders and root servers to resolve registered domain names without your domain and any registered domain names clashing, because there is no registered domain name that ends with .local on the internet.

Active directory relies heavily on DNS, and you must have a DNS zone to use it.

Reverse lookup zones are used to resolve host IPs to FQDN.
An IP address is made up of two components, the host componet and the subnet component.
Zones basically keep information about hosts that fall under them.
Reverse lookup zones are therefore named after the subnet they are responsible for and keep infomation about the hosts that fall under that subnet.

The IP address you have entered above is a class C address and has a total of 254 hosts in the 255.255.255.0 subnet.
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by:Peter_Fabri
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Once I've setup at least one zone (Peter_Fabri.com) and, say, a sub zone (test.Peter_fabri.com), can I now install Active Directory or do I need further preparation?

Peter
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