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Direct memory manipulation from perl

str8dn
str8dn asked
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Last Modified: 2010-05-18
We have a runtime databank of addresses that are currently accessed with c-programs.  I am hoping to gain the functionality of PERL in several portions of the project that are not time-critical.   Is it possible to have perl directly read and edit this memory bank similarly to what c does?  

For example, I would need to be able to pass a perl script a list of addresses, and then have the script read the existing data from the RAM.  Also, if new variables were created, they would have to be then placed in specific/ newly dedicated locations.  (There is aof course a memeory tracking scheme already in place...)

One might suggest "simply" embedding perl into C, and have C handle the addressing, but I was hoping for a more direct route.  For some reason I can successfullly embed perl in Windows and in several Unix system (inc. Linux), but have been unsuccessful on Onyx (SGI) and Cygwin - the examples in perlembed are unresponsive.
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Commented:
A further example will probably help...

Say I use C code to create a variable called var1:

double *var1
var1 = (double) malloc (2000);

If I know the address in RAM where the 2000 bit value for val1 is stored, is there a way to acces the data via a PERL script?
Reading var1 with a c-program, and then passing the values is an option, but I was hoping to find a more elegant solution...

Thanks,

str8dn
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Commented:
I will take a look, thanks.

str8dn

Author

Commented:
Thanks for the info.  After looking over it I have decided another, less intensive route, will give me closer to what I really want, with protability to boot.

Thanks again,

str8dn
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