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Every time Outlook XP (2002) is opened, when you click new to send message you get an security pop-up

When opening Outlook XP (2000) and attempting to send a new message, an error pops up.

When you click new message, Outlook says "A program is trying to access e-mail addresses you have stored in Outlook. Do you want to allow this?"

Now, this is an Outlook XP client in an Exchange 2000 enviornment and once you click yes or no, it works without further prompting until Outlook is closed and opened again. Turning of using Microsoft Word for editing gets rid of this error, but some people want to continue to use Word as their editor without receiving this error. Does anyone no of a way to remedy this?

Frustrated with WinBloze!
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1 Solution
This is not normal behaviour - it doesn't happen to any of my customers (or me). The message is an anti-viral 'feature' of the product, than means what it says and does not have a reputation for being triggered incorrectly AFAIK. (Although lots of developers think their code should be immune... snicker.)

I suspect you either have:
- code in the word template being used for the new message format
- some sort of document management system or other word addin that usually works fine (directly in Word), but which is raising the hackles of the OMG [probably written for OL2K pre-OMG]
- a virus

Cure will depend on which of these is the culprit... Let us know what you find.
This is also a pretty good article on the entire process.


PonyboyCurtis00Author Commented:
Thank you both for your responses. I have read some of those answers although the link to the Microsoft error Q article is the most informative. I was hoping someone had come up with a better solution. It is actually due to the installation of the Outlook Security patch I recently installed for Office XP and not a virus. This is definitely one of those instances where you wish Microsoft had just left things alone, as anyone who is running a network and has some wits about them knows to run anti-virus or some other appliance or program designed to block things for you, and certainly does not want to rely on Microsoft to handle such events. Case and point exactly... Rosesolutions1, thanks for the advice, but due to the usefulness of the Q article, I am tossing the points to RCMB. Thanks to both of your for your comments...
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