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Windows Routing Problem

Posted on 2004-04-13
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Last Modified: 2013-11-30
I have two networks which I need to connect via Windows 2000 Server Routing.  Each network was originally stand alone, with their own gateway/firewall, domains, and DNS.  I now need both networks to be able to talk to each other and I am having a slight problem with a part of it, and I am hoping that someone can fill me in on what I am missing.  

I have two networks:

Network A: 169.254.244.0
Network B: 192.168.0.0

I have one Windows 2000 Box with 2 network cards:
Network A: 169.254.244.251
Network B:  192.168.0.12

I changed the registry to allow ip routing, did the configure and enable Routing and Remote Access Part.  I am now in the following situation.  Network A seems to work perfectly.  I can ping machines on Network B, as well as access the internet.  On network B, I am able to successfully ping computers on Network A, however none of the computers can access the internet.  DNS seems to be working fine, as I can resolve Internet domain names, however I think I am missing something on the gateway part.  Any help would be appreciated.  

-NINE
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Question by:NINE
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by:NINE
ID: 10817523
Just realized it may be helpful to add some more information.  

On the router I have each network card set up with a default gateway that pertains to the network it is on.  (169.254.244.222, and 192.168.0.254)

On the Computers on Network A: I have all gateways pointing at 169.254.244.251, and on Network B: I have all gateways pointing to 192.168.0.12

My routing table looks like this:

Network Destination        Netmask          Gateway       Interface  Metric
          0.0.0.0          0.0.0.0  169.254.244.222  169.254.244.152      1
          0.0.0.0          0.0.0.0    192.168.0.254    192.168.0.12       1
        127.0.0.0        255.0.0.0        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1       1
    169.254.244.0    255.255.255.0  169.254.244.152  169.254.244.152      1
  169.254.244.152  255.255.255.255        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1       1
  169.254.255.255  255.255.255.255  169.254.244.152  169.254.244.152      1
      192.168.0.0    255.255.255.0     192.168.0.12    192.168.0.12       1
     192.168.0.12  255.255.255.255        127.0.0.1       127.0.0.1       1
    192.168.0.255  255.255.255.255     192.168.0.12    192.168.0.12       1
        224.0.0.0        224.0.0.0  169.254.244.152  169.254.244.152      1
        224.0.0.0        224.0.0.0     192.168.0.12    192.168.0.12       1
  255.255.255.255  255.255.255.255     192.168.0.12    192.168.0.12       1
Default Gateway:   169.254.244.222
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by:lrmoore
ID: 10817837
>         0.0.0.0          0.0.0.0    192.168.0.254    192.168.0.12       1

Remove the default gateway on the second NIC.

C:\>route delete 0.0.0.0 mask 0.0.0.0 192.168.0.254

You can only have one default route in your situation.
If you want Site B's internet-bound packets to be routed out the actual gateway at 169.254.244.222, then what you are doing now is bouncing them back out to a different gateway of 192.168.0.254

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by:JaniceLaw
ID: 10818803
The other problem is that both network are using IANA reserved IP address and ISP is suppose to drop those. You probably had some sort of DSL routers on those networks before that did NAT for them. If I have to guess your current configuration, you probably disconnected the second router on network B and are trying to bridge the 2 networks throught the 1 connection that is still on Network A.

The simplist solution would probably be to configure your server to do NAT for the computers on network B. Go into RRAS and setup the 169.254.0.12 as the public interface with NAT and the 192.168.0.12 as the private interface. And set the default route on all your network B to 192.168.0.12.
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by:anupnellip
ID: 10820855
I think the easy solution would be to just add static routes on the the m/c at network B to point network A . this way you dont have to change the default route . You can make the default route as the old default & just add a route add command on all the clients on network B .
 example

route ADD -p 169.254.244.0 MASK 255.255.255.0  192.168.0.12
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haresh-nyc earned 500 total points
ID: 10829310
hi,

yes,
definitely delete the route:     0.0.0.0          0.0.0.0    192.168.0.254    192.168.0.12

Further,

The problem lies in your internet router, not your windows router.
what's happening is that your internet router has only ONE internal route, which is on your 169.254.244 network.

If you can configure your internet router and add a static route to it, which states that the 192.168.0 network should be routed thru the LAN port on that router.

If you only delete the 0.0.0.0 route stated above, and don't include a static route on your internet router (the one at 169.254.244.222), all ip traffic originating from the 169.254.244 network will never be directed by your internet router back to your lan. That's where your entire problem lies.
Trust me, I've done this exact scenario, and it took a couple of CCNP's a few hours to understand what I did to make it work.

please let me know what happens.
haresh
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