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Rolling Back from v 1.1 to 1.0

Posted on 2004-04-13
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Last Modified: 2011-04-14
Does anyone have advice on how to go about doing this?  I'm pretty sure I'm not using anything that was only in 1.1, but even still, how do I translate the solutions and projects back to find out?

Is there any way to set .NET 2003 to compile with 1.0?

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Question by:jjacksn
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by:ptmcomp
ID: 10821562
Yes, if you have both Frameworks installed there is an option in the project or solution properties. To run an ASP.NET application with a specific framework you also need to use "aspnet_regiis" of the according framework. For options of "aspnet_regiis" use the parameter "/?".
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by:vascov
vascov earned 200 total points
ID: 10822619
Is this an ASP.NET project ?

You can very easily test and eventually deploy your assemblies built with v1.1 to make use of v1.0, and this wont make you recompile anything. You'll just need to create or update a config file.
Look at this page for info: http://www.gotdotnet.com/team/changeinfo/default.aspx

hth

Vasco
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by:jjacksn
ID: 10824451
this is C#, client and server apps.
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ptmcomp earned 300 total points
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by:jjacksn
ID: 10824682
holy crap that isn't fun.  but hopefully it will work.  

So if my server if my server is and client have the same version of a dll, but one is running on 1.1 (Server) and the client is running on (1.0), I'm assuming that the remoting interface will still work properly?



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by:jjacksn
ID: 10824723
Also, do you know of any programs that can spy on my .exe and tell me which .NET framework dlls I am using?
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by:ptmcomp
ID: 10824974
I'm actually running the client on 1.1 and server on 1.0 and I don't have problems so far.
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by:jjacksn
ID: 10829248
wow, this is a raging pain, is there anyway to detect all the dlls my exe are using.
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by:vascov
ID: 10829294
Hi,

If you're using VS.NET 2k3 and don't want to edit the config files yourself, just go to Project / Properties, and then in the Common Properties/General properties, you'll see a property called "Supported Runtimes". Click on it, select the type of runtime, and it will edit / create the config file for you.

Vasco
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by:jjacksn
ID: 10829875
daaaaa vasco, couldn't have saved mucho time. thanks.
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by:jjacksn
ID: 10829944
that doesn't have any of my own dlls in it.... so I still need to add those by hand?
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by:ptmcomp
ID: 10830976
If you're using strong names, yes - else there is no need (as far as I know). That's one reason why I gave up using strong names.
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by:jjacksn
ID: 10832235
What do you mean by strong names (what are they)?  

So for your apps, you can just include the default file generated and everything is peachy?
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by:ptmcomp
ID: 10832332
Your assemblies are strong named if you used a private key to sign them.
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by:jjacksn
ID: 10832423
I did not do that.  Among that reason you just listed, we were having problems accross CVS and dropped it.  

So, are you saying I don't need to add any assemblies to the file generate by VS.NET so long as none of my dlls or exe are strong named?

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by:ptmcomp
ID: 10832794
I didn't have to do that but I don't know your project in details. Of course the dlls must be compatible (you cannot call code that doesn't exist).
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by:vascov
ID: 10851425
Hi, just a comment, your files being signed or not is irrelevant, unless you also want to have multiple assembly versions of your own assemblies.

Also, another simple way to have your code (compiled with v1.1), using v1.0, is simply to have this in your configuration file.
<configuration>
  <startup>
    <requiredRuntime version="v1.0.3705" safemode="true"/>
  </startup>
</configuration>

This will make your app use the v1.0 assemblies.

hth

Vasco

PS: sorry for answering so late... i've been really busy
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by:jjacksn
ID: 10852146
The issue is i want it to use 1.1 if it exists.  will your config file do that?  

Also, one of the issues I having is with setting the timeout on a .NET remoting channel (http).  Apparently, that is not a valid attribute in 1.0?  Is there an equivelent way to do that or must I put it in a config file?
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by:vascov
ID: 10852821
Hi jjacksn,

In the first link i sent you it's explained how you can achieve that.

Try this:
<configuration>
   <startup>
      <supportedRuntime version="v1.1.4322"/>
      <supportedRuntime version="v1.0.3705"/>
   </startup>
</configuration>

This is like saying i do support this runtimes, and i prefer the 1st one, than the 2nd, and so on (there are only two at present :)

hth

Vasco
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by:ptmcomp
ID: 10852855
>Hi, just a comment, your files being signed or not is irrelevant, unless you also want to have multiple assembly versions of your own assemblies.
I experienced something else. If your assembly is signed you can only reference assemblies that are also signed and even you didn't place it in the GAC you are not able to replace a referenced assembly with a newer version.
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by:vascov
ID: 10852872
ptmcomp, that's a condition for a given assembly to be strongnamed (that all it's dependencies are also strongnamed, otherwise your assembly could end up referencing private assemblies, which would beat the purpose of making it global)
Note that the framework assemblies are all strongnamed. (actually that's precisely what makes it possible to bind to different versions dinamically)

As i said, this may be needed if you're planning on versioning your own assemblies, but doesn't affect the framework version you're running.

Vasco
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by:jjacksn
ID: 10853882
I do version my assemblies, but I overwrite the old ones.  

Also, why do the links you gave me list so many files, as opposed to your config file?
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