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Can't access network or internet with new W2K Pro install

Posted on 2004-04-13
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Last Modified: 2010-04-11
I have a networking problem with Windows 2000.
I made a backup of a 500 MHz computer (A) running Windows 2000, for migration to a 1GHz computer (B).  Did a fresh install of Windows 2000 on B followed by backup restore.  Loaded all necessary drivers for the new Intel board and was able to go online using my home network.  Completed updates of Windows and Office.  
Took the computer in to the office it will be used in, removed computer A (able to access the LAN and internet). Connected computer B and cannot access LAN or internet.... When I open the LAN  connection it only sees itself, but other computers on the network are able to see (but not access) computer B.
Unable to ping either direction.
Ipconfig shows a 169.x.x.x IP address rather than the necessary 192.168.x.x and is unable to renew.
All settings appear to be the same but I must be missing something...
Reconnected A and works well.... B is waiting for the answer to this problem...
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Question by:nforsyth
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22 Comments
 

Expert Comment

by:brakesh
ID: 10819044
Are you able to see the contents of Network Neighbourhood or My network Places?? If not please re-install the LAN card drivers and check the plug in and fix the LAN card properly to the slot. Just to make sure hardware everything is proper.

If everything is fine, then change the IP address, and domain. This should work out. then try to ping the neighbour system.

Cheers..............
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Expert Comment

by:funkusmunkus
ID: 10819478
Well if your IP address is 169.X.X.X that's the default windows ip address range, which means your not able to access the DHCP server, if you don't have a DHCP server then your have to give it a 192.168.X(same as network your ont).X(a unique number on the network), but if there is a DHCP server then reinstalling your network card drivers (or maybe the card has issues) should solve the problem, that's only if you have a DHCP server, or router that gives out DHCP addresses.

Hope that helps
Cheers
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Author Comment

by:nforsyth
ID: 10819913
Sorry, I should have mentioned that I did try removing the network adapter and reinstalling the drivers, but made no difference.  Also, it is an onboard NIC and has good loopback response.  Computer A is able to access a dynamic IP --- access DHCP server.
Do you think it would make any difference to remove and reinstall Client for Microsoft Networks, TCP/IP, File and Print Sharing???
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Expert Comment

by:funkusmunkus
ID: 10819937
you could but just for arguments sake, put the network card from computer A in computer B, and see if that one picks up the DHCP server
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Expert Comment

by:shaggyb
ID: 10819969
check to see if you have a firewall and make sure that the ndis 5.0 is allowed to pass through
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Expert Comment

by:tancy1
ID: 10820196
Do you have DHCP server in your office?
If yes, go to the properties of your network neighbourhood, double click on your TCP/IP protocol and select obtain IP address
automatically.
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Expert Comment

by:funkusmunkus
ID: 10820340
The reason he's getting a 169.X.X.X is coz he has it set to obtain ip address automatically, and when a windows machine can't find a DHCP server it gives it's self a random number under 169.245(i think).x.x, so he's got that part right,  nforsyth can you ping 127.0.0.1 ? if you can means your TCP/IP configurations are correct, well I'm pretty sure they would be anyway, i might be wrong.

and shaggy, i don't think an xp firewall would stop recieving dhcp.

i'd say it's more of a hardware issue with the network card or the driver.

can a w2k or w2k3 server prevent more computers from being added to the network? don't know if it can, but look into it if that's what your running
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Expert Comment

by:funkusmunkus
ID: 10820342
sorry windows 2000 not xp
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Expert Comment

by:shaggyb
ID: 10820506
http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/hwdev/tech/network/ndis5.mspx

i never spoke of windows xp firewall  really any firewall like say sygate...zonealarm etc that if someone inadvertantly blocked the ndis would experience netwrok problems..... see link above
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Author Comment

by:nforsyth
ID: 10820564
No firewall, and all the settings are direct from a restore of Computer A.
Everything worked great on my home network, so hardware seems OK..... didn't have to change a thing for that.
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Author Comment

by:nforsyth
ID: 10820600
and yes I can ping 127.0.0.1
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Expert Comment

by:pseudocyber
ID: 10821330
At work, do you admin the network?  Theoretically, it could really be locked down - so much so that it has a reservation for the other MAC address on the NIC in computer A.  Can you spoof the MAC on B - can you put in A's MAC?  What about if you put A's NIC in the B and then try to plug into the network?
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Expert Comment

by:Nyaema
ID: 10822041
On your DHCP Server, check to see that you have not exhausted the available scope IPs.

If not give the computer a static IP and try to ping other computers.
If you can ping using a static IP, change it back again to dynamic, and try again.

Also apply the latest service pack.
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Author Comment

by:nforsyth
ID: 10823202
Logged on through Administrator account.

Small network with no dedicated Server.... this computer connected to hub branched off router.
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Expert Comment

by:Nyaema
ID: 10824362
What are you using for a DHCP server?
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Author Comment

by:nforsyth
ID: 10826437
The router acts as DHCP server
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Expert Comment

by:Nyaema
ID: 10832226
What is the scope of Dynamic IPs given by the router and how many PCs do you have?
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Author Comment

by:nforsyth
ID: 10833569
I don't know exactly the range of IPs, but there are only 5 computers and given that the first computer -- A (that I'm trying to replace) has no problem acquiring a dynamic IP when connected, I don't think that's the problem.
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Author Comment

by:nforsyth
ID: 10836816
OK..  I put in a static IP address, subnet mask and gateway, and was able to access the LAN.  
Will try entering number for the DNS suffix (once I obtain this info) to see if I can get on the internet...
Why would it need static addresses when all the others work with dynamic.... and it functioned with dynamic when I had it set up at home...?????
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Assisted Solution

by:funkusmunkus
funkusmunkus earned 200 total points
ID: 10838876
maybe the router you got only supports so many users, and it's assigned the remaining ip address to your old mac address(network card factory number) from PC A.
if you want to get internet access just make the DNS address samea s your gateways, and that should be enuogh to access the net.
if you could get on the router using a web browser, then you might find out why it's not working.
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Accepted Solution

by:
Nyaema earned 200 total points
ID: 10840073
There could be a couple of explanations.
1. The  scope of dynamic IPs has been exhausted.
You could have 254 addresses in the scope, but all have been assigned to 254 mac addresses (maybe you have had 254 visitors with notebooks...) or you could have 5 addresses in the scope.
2.The rest of the range has been assigned to MAC addresses not in your LAN.


We can try a couple of things to try and resolve the problem.  It could help if we knew the model of your router.

1.Try recycying the power on your router.
2.Connect the old PC which was able to acquire a dynamic IP address and release its IP allocation by typing IPConfig /release

Then connect the new PC and try to acquire a dynamic IP address.  remember to remove the Static IP.
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Author Comment

by:nforsyth
ID: 10846452
Thanks funkusmunkus and Nyaema, you got me out of my 'brain-rut' and focused on the router!
Called up the router through the browser and sure enough all the IPs were used and Computer A's MAC was there.
Released the IP then connected the new computer ---  renewed IP and SUCCESS!!!
Nothing to it once I was on track......
Thanks again for all your help.
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