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How do I back up within a directory?

Posted on 2004-04-13
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
Seems like a simple question but I have not been able to find the answer.....Is there a way to backup a level within a directory in Solaris?  I usually will dig down into a multilevel directory and then cd back out to the main area and then have to dig back down into the directory to get to a level that was right above where I was previously.  Is there a command that will let me back my way out of a directory?
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Question by:roduno
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9 Comments
 
LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
jlevie earned 125 total points
ID: 10820108
'cd ..' will take you up one level, 'cd ../../' two levels, and 'cd ../../other-dir' will go up two levels and down into "other-dir."
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Expert Comment

by:Tintin
ID: 10820111
There's a number of approaches (of which some are shell dependent).

In ksh/bash, you can do

cd -

to cd to the last directory you where in.

In csh/tcsh, you have the pushd and popd functions to pop/push directories onto a stack.

Another approach is to set up aliases for your favourite dirs, eg:

alias mydir='cd /path/to/some/long/dir'

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LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 10820510
pushd ./next/level
echo in `pwd` now
pushd
echo back in `pwd`
pushd
echo no in `pwd` again
popd
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LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 10820518
s/no/now/

(sorry for typos)
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LVL 12

Expert Comment

by:stefan73
ID: 10820985
Hi roduno,
Yes, "cd .." works. But be careful when your cd path contains soft links. ".." is a hard link to the parent directory. "cd .." might not get you back to the parent directory you expected.

Cheers,
Stefan
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Expert Comment

by:ahoffmann
ID: 10822383
> cd ..
hence pushd, it does not have this problem (depending on shell, OS, or whatever)
;-)
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Expert Comment

by:stefan73
ID: 10823158
ahoffmann,
Yes, very helpful.

Stefan
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Author Comment

by:roduno
ID: 10838612
I must have a faulty or weird os because none of the above suggestions worked.  All I get when I try them is "not found".
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Author Comment

by:roduno
ID: 10838725
My bad..... I wasn't putting a space between the cd and the ..
I got it now!  Thanks alot!
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