Solved

ATX PSU auxiliary output does not switch off when PC is shut down

Posted on 2004-04-14
8
458 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-25
I have just fitted a new motherboard into my PC, and consequently had to fit a better PSU (400W ATX).  Unfortunately, the three-pin PSU auxiliary output does not lose power when the PC is shut down.  This means that the attached monitor, which is powered from this output, has to be turned off manually.  I know it's not major, but my old PSU did this and I don't know if it is a fault or part of the functionality of the new PSU.

Any advice would be much appreciated.

I have checked the BIOS and power management, but there is nothing obvious to change.
0
Comment
Question by:JustinByrom
8 Comments
 
LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:Snowguy
ID: 10828441
This would be somthing bilt into the PSU.
So you need to find one that will switch off the auxiliary output.
Most ATX power supply's dont have an extra output. like the old AT's did.
You must have looked hard to find what you have now.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:JustinByrom
ID: 10828518
No, not really Snowguy, as I decided I'd buy a decent case whilst I was at it.  That came with a PSU.

I decided to try EE because a bit of investigating led me to the conclusion (as you have said) that it is not easy to find an ATX PSU with an auxiliary output nowadays.

Oh well ...
0
 
LVL 12

Accepted Solution

by:
public earned 75 total points
ID: 10830789
To turn off the aux output would require an extra relay in the PSU.
Most monitors go to sleep when there is no signal, and consume ~5W, thus a power switch is not really needed.
0
Free Tool: Port Scanner

Check which ports are open to the outside world. Helps make sure that your firewall rules are working as intended.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:radomirthegreat
ID: 10847674
Out of pure curiosity, would your PSU just so happen to be made by Xcase, Powmax, or Raidmax?
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:JustinByrom
ID: 10853800
Radomirthegreat, the PSU is made by Xcase.  Why ?
0
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:radomirthegreat
ID: 10856029
Oh, dear...  My Xcase PSU blew up my $115 motherboard!  Aaaah!

Please, please, please get rid of it!  It seemed fine for about two weeks, and then it just went KA-SPLAT!

http://oldlook.experts-exchange.com:8080/Hardware/Q_20910173.html

Here's my post:
http://oldlook.experts-exchange.com:8080/Hardware/Q_20790214.html

Please do not blame increasing the core voltage.  It was at 1.74 instead of 1.75, so I wanted to take it up t 1.765 - nothing like that could ever damage the motherboard.

Xcase makes very cheap power supplies!  They're really bad and completely undependable!  I was just looking for a certain thread, but I couldn't find it; it was about one www.ibuypower.com 's computers not starting up after a while.  After replacing the PSU (Xcase), everything booted up normally.  The power supply (which (I don't use anymore) puts out 5.51V on the 5V rail, which is FAR too much!  The voltages change dramatically - and for the worse - as the temperature changes.

Xcase is known for the crappy power supplies it produces.  I don't know who would ever willingly buy them after learning about their frequent breakdown and the deaths of components powered by those things.  Nearly every day, I look at my dead MSI K7N-2 Delta sitting on my desk, and I'm reminded every time of the great dependability I had with my 300W Antec and the great performance I got out of my system.  It was the first PC I had ever built, and I poured my heart out into buying high-quality, high-performance parts, but I greedily overlooked the power supply just so I can get more overall watts for less money.

Your current PC may never die with that PSU, or it may, and the PSU just might damage critical components like the motherboard, the CPU, etc.  So, why risk it?  I suppose I can understand the importance of the aux. output, but can you please make that compromise for the safety of your better PC parts?

Thank you,
Radomir Jordanovic
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:JustinByrom
ID: 10857665
Radomir,

Thanks for the advice.  I have ordered a brand new PSU and have ditched the idea of the auxiliary output.  I must admit I didn't know that PSUs could cause so many potential problems.

Thanks again for the advice.

Justin
0
 
LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:radomirthegreat
ID: 10863844
You're very welcome!
0

Featured Post

Announcing the Most Valuable Experts of 2016

MVEs are more concerned with the satisfaction of those they help than with the considerable points they can earn. They are the types of people you feel privileged to call colleagues. Join us in honoring this amazing group of Experts.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Article by: SHIELD1
The 5 R's 1. Repair 2. Restore 3. Reinstall 4. Remote admin 5. Run away OK so I'm not the most skilled engineer around but I definitely have an abundance of experience: electronic repairs since I was 13 and PC and computer hardware repair…
Skype is a P2P (Peer to Peer) instant messaging and VOIP (Voice over IP) service – as well as a whole lot more.
Microsoft Active Directory, the widely used IT infrastructure, is known for its high risk of credential theft. The best way to test your Active Directory’s vulnerabilities to pass-the-ticket, pass-the-hash, privilege escalation, and malware attacks …
Finds all prime numbers in a range requested and places them in a public primes() array. I've demostrated a template size of 30 (2 * 3 * 5) but larger templates can be built such 210  (2 * 3 * 5 * 7) or 2310  (2 * 3 * 5 * 7 * 11). The larger templa…

839 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question