Solved

Upgrading server to gigabit

Posted on 2004-04-15
7
293 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-11
We have a small network, about 10 users, and was thinking about upgrading the server and switch to gigabit. There is quite a bit of traffic to the server. Would it make much difference just switching the server and switch to 1 gig and the keep the workstations at 100 mbs (I guess I'm thinking that since the workstations are still at 100, then the server will be waiting just as long for the transfer).
0
Comment
Question by:avoorheis
7 Comments
 

Author Comment

by:avoorheis
ID: 10836239
And... would there be a big jump by making all the workstations 1 gig with the switch being all 1 gig.

thanks
0
 
LVL 11

Assisted Solution

by:PennGwyn
PennGwyn earned 100 total points
ID: 10836274
Switches are routinely used, especially in "store and forward" mode, to accomodate differences in bandwidth between segments.

In theory, your gigabit server link could handle enough traffic to keep 10 100Mbps links saturated, and this works in both directions.

In practice, Ethernet segments rarely run anywhere near full saturation.  You might look at actual bandwidth use on the server port (I like MRTG!) to determine if it is a bottleneck, before shelling out for the upgrade.  ("quite a bit of traffic" doesn't tell you if the server link is ever getting saturated....)

0
 
LVL 4

Accepted Solution

by:
Beachdude67 earned 140 total points
ID: 10836616
avoor,

I think with 1 server and 10 workstations, gigabit switches/NICs are overkill. The big reason to upgrade to gigabit would be if you had a backbone with several servers on it. Over the network you site, 100mbps is probably fine unless you are doing video editing or something extreme that requires that sort of bandwidth. Keep in mind that over the links that you are upgrading to 1000mbps you may well have to upgrade the cabling from cat 5 to cat 6 - so keep that in mind when considering costs if you are dead set on doing this.
0
What is SQL Server and how does it work?

The purpose of this paper is to provide you background on SQL Server. It’s your self-study guide for learning fundamentals. It includes both the history of SQL and its technical basics. Concepts and definitions will form the solid foundation of your future DBA expertise.

 
LVL 27

Assisted Solution

by:pseudocyber
pseudocyber earned 100 total points
ID: 10838072
What kind of traffic are your users generating?  Streaming media?  Routinely moving 100MB files around?  Or just normal file and print services?

What kind of switch connects the users to the server?  Are you SURE you have no issues with duplex mismatches between the users and the switch and especially the switch to the server?

Do you have hard facts - like x amount of port utilization is occuring or are you just going off users saying "the 'network' is slow"?
0
 
LVL 1

Assisted Solution

by:joeroket
joeroket earned 80 total points
ID: 10839539
I would have to say you would be wasting your money buying a gigabit switch and NIC for the server.

I work in a network that has multiple segments and only some of the segements run at 100mbps, most run at 10mbps. rarely do we have problems with internal congestion. The thing you have to realize is that the workstations will still only transfer at 100mbps so the saturation to the server probably will not be noticed very much.
0
 
LVL 1

Assisted Solution

by:Nermal
Nermal earned 80 total points
ID: 10847510
I think I would have to agree as well, it would be a terrible waste of money.

I run a network with approx. 800-900 workstations running through a 100Mb internet link and have only recently started upgrading some of my fibre links between distant parts of the building to Gigabit, as I was starting to see congestion on 1 of them.

Most of the workstations here are either 10 or 100, all the servers are 100. We generally pull anywhere between 60 - 150Gb of traffic into the network daily, and I have never had any complaints about speed.

I think you would probably be wiser in purchsing better quality switches/nics (if you haven't already) than purchasing gigabit.
0
 

Author Comment

by:avoorheis
ID: 10849967
Thank you all for your feedback. I think what I got from this was that it certainly could help, but, need some hard facts to determine if it actually will help. So, my next question (another post) will be to figure out the best way to measure.
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Site Down Detector

Helpful to verify reports of your own downtime, or to double check a downed website you are trying to access.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

If your business is like most, chances are you still need to maintain a fax infrastructure for your staff. It’s hard to believe that a communication technology that was thriving in the mid-80s could still be an essential part of your team’s modern I…
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem.   Tips on how to secure IoT devices, even the dumbest ones, so they can't be used as part of a DDoS botnet.  Use PRTG Network Monitor as one of the building blocks, to detect unusual…
Internet Business Fax to Email Made Easy - With  eFax Corporate (http://www.enterprise.efax.com), you'll receive a dedicated online fax number, which is used the same way as a typical analog fax number. You'll receive secure faxes in your email, f…
Here's a very brief overview of the methods PRTG Network Monitor (https://www.paessler.com/prtg) offers for monitoring bandwidth, to help you decide which methods you´d like to investigate in more detail.  The methods are covered in more detail in o…

821 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question