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What are the performance impacts to use C++ style basic_string<char> instead of C style char *?

Posted on 2004-04-16
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You can talk about performance in term of both memory usage and time efficiency for general operations like concat, cpy, pattern matching, etc.
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Question by:ajaxcal
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by:Sys_Prog
ID: 10847698
I assume that u have read thru the benefits of std::string over "C style strings" i.e. char *

Regarding the overhead thind, I really do not see any worthless overhead (if any) against the benefits it provides

Since, the std::string is normally implemented as a char * with some extra range/size checks, it is defenitely better than C style char *

But yes, there would be a considerable increase of size of code becuase of the STL includes taking place

Amit

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Mercantilum earned 499 total points
ID: 10847731
Yes there is an overhead using the string class.
So if you really know what you do in C, and manage by yourself some of the features of string, you can get a bit of speed.

An example: string internally stores the length of the string.
In C when you do
   char x[LEN];
   strcpy (x, "abcdefghijklm");
   ...
   strcat (x, y);
   strcat (x, z);
The two strcat are costly as 'strcat' has first to find the end of x, before to add y. And it does it again for z.
While in C++, the length is stored somewhere, so "strcat (x,y)" would be equivalent to "strcpy (x+lenx, y)" which is faster.

But if you manage the length by yourself in C, you can achieve the same result, simulating the 'string' behaviour, e.g.
     char x[LEN];
     int len;
   strcpy (x, "abcdefghijklm");
   len x= strlen(x);
   ...
   strcpy (x+len, y);  // strcpy! at the right place
   len += strlen(y);   // calc the length of y only
   strcpy (x+len, z);
   len += strlen(z);

By understanding well the behaviour of the C funtions and pointers, you can get an efficient program.
But the readiness of a 'string' based program is better :)
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