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How do I enable 8bit mode linux desktop?.

Posted on 2004-04-17
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
Hi,
I am working on linux 7.2, I am using gnome desktop.
I can login from original desktop to second desktop  by ctrl + alt F2 , allows me to login second desktop, however I would like to know how to open GUI desktop?. ordinary "startx" command does't help.
so can anyone help me how to enable 8bit desktop mode?.
thanks in advance
sivasankar
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Question by:r_sivasankar
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by:jlevie
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You can't start another X server and Gui display on an alternate console. The X server that is running the original, login, desktop takes over the video card.
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by:Karl Heinz Kremer
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You _can_ start a second X server. I do this all the time: I have three X servers running right now on my Linux system. One is the local X session, one is is a remote session running on my Solaris machine, and the third is a remote session to another Linux box.

You may run into problems when you run two different X sessions connected to the same config files in your home directory, but other than that it would work just fine.

Run X --help to find out which parameters the command supports. If you want to run a completely different configuration, you should probably create a copy of the XF86Config file and use the -xf86config <file> parameter. You can also specify the bit depth with the -depth <n> parameter.

The trick to get more than one server running is to use the :1 (or :2, :3) display number. The default display is :0, which is on the 7th virtual console (Alt-Ctrl-7), with :1 you get a server running on the 8th console...

X gives you just the server, nothing else. You probably want your normal desktop. This is done with startx. You can pass a display number to startx as well
startx -- :1
(I cannot test this right now, but it should work).
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by:Karl Heinz Kremer
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BTW: If you do have a remote machine that runs xdm with remote logins enables, you can do this:

X -query <remote server> :1

This will convert your Linux box into a X terminal.
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by:willy134
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X --depth 8
runs x at depth 8
X --depth 8 :1
as described above.

startx --depth 8 should also work.
I have several times used several X desktops on a local machine because one desktop needs to be 8bit for some application.  Then I use ctrl-alt-f7/f8 to switch between the two.  I also have to start the display manager by hand

export display=:1
startkde (if that doesn't run X itself)
xterm //as a backup

--willy
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Karl Heinz Kremer earned 50 total points
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As I already mentioned, -depth is one of the options that X supports :-)

For startx you need to indicate that you are specifying server options:
xinit <client options> -- <server options> This means that the command should look like this:

xinit -- -depth 8 :1

(and, it's only one '-' for server options)
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