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I loaded Windows 2000 and Fat32 file system and now I have a new drive showing in My Computer

Posted on 2004-04-18
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Installed Windows 2000 on C drive and used Fat32 file system.  I have a 2nd (slave) drive that is also formated for Fat32 files (it was the original drive and originally had Windows 98 installed on it - I formated it and cleaned it off).  When I rebooted recently I got some kind of message on boot up - can't remember what exactly it said but it was something about NTFS file system.  

My original drives are as follow:

Master drive  20 GiG hard drive
Slave drive is an 8 Gig hard drive

All of a sudden I now have an extra drive and they read as follows:

C drive (fat32) 11.1 GIG
D drive (fat32)   8 GIG
E drive (1st appeared as a NTFS dirve now reads FAT32 after I formated it) - 18.9 GIG

I am confused on what happed and why.  Where did the extra drive come from and why did my C drive shrink to 11 GIG and yet the E drive show the whole 20 GIGS???

Help!

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Question by:mjdey
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by:sirbounty
ID: 10855894
In Windows 2000 - click Start->Run->Diskmgmt.msc - what is displayed there for physical disks and partitioning?
Almost sounds like your master has been split partitioned, but that doesn't account for the 18.9G E partition.

Try booting into BIOS and see what drives are detected there as well..
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by:pjimerson
ID: 10855928
You definitely want to check disk management (as suggested above).  Be sure to look for some indication regarding which drive you're booting from.  The boot partition will be indicated by the word "Boot" somewhere on it.  It sounds to me like you're not booting from the drive you expected to boot from.  If you're willing to wipe all drives and re-install you can pre-indicate the boot partition by running fdisk (you'll need a dos bootable floppy) and specifying the partition you want to boot from as the "Active" partition.  Note:  You can also do this with partition magic rescue disks if you have any but you'll need to run the win2k installation again afterwards and either reinstall windows or repair the current installation.

Good Luck,

pjimerson
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by:pjimerson
ID: 10855946
One other thing,

If I read your letter correctly you've got

E drive mapped to the entire disk
C and D dirves mapped to different partitions on that same disk.

If my read is accurate I can't tell you why this happened but I can tell you that I think you'll need to scrap the entire install, wipe the partition table on that disk and start all over again.  I'd also suggest doing some kind of low level format if possible.  You want to make sure that nothing on that disk gets carried over to the next operating system.

When partition tables get messed up you usually end up losing data ..... all of it.  If it still works I'd suggest moving anything you can to another disk (preferably another computer) right away.

pjimerson
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by:mjdey
ID: 10855980
The diskmgmt show the following info:

C:  Partition - basic Fat32- Healthy (system) 11.16 GB   Fault to - No
D:  Partition Basic Fat32 - Healthy (active) 7.85 GB - Fault to -no
E:  Patition Basic Fat32 - Health  19.00 GB - Fault to - no

**note; pjimerson - I don't think you read it right because I have two separate hard drives (physical boxes) one is a 20 Gig and the other is an 8gig so I think that what it was telling me is that it is showing 11....gig of the 20 gig and the the other drive almost all and then the whole of the 1st dive - 11 and now 19gig - does that sound right?
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by:sirbounty
ID: 10855988
Something certainly isn't adding up right here.
Can you check your BIOS and post back with the type of drives that it identifies as being installed in your system?
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by:mjdey
ID: 10856009
I just checked the Bios and it reads as follows:

Primary  Drive  size 20418  (at the end of the line it says 32bit Off (?))

Slave Drive size 8456 (at the end of the line it says 32 bit off (?))

Is this the info you are requesting above?

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by:mjdey
ID: 10856017
Also, I had loaded quite a few programs and everything seems to be running great.  ?  Do you suppose it might be OK or do you really think it will need to be redone again?
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by:sirbounty
ID: 10856023
Can you navigate to each of these drives?
Start->Run->C:
Start->Run->D:
Start->Run->E:
???


In Disk Manager, at the bottom, how are these identified on the left-side?
Disk 0, Disk 1 & Disk 2?
Right-click the Disk # there, -what menu option is available?
Then click Properties and click Volumes - post back with this info...
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by:sirbounty
ID: 10856026
I'm concerned b/c it doesn't add up.
It might be something just mis-reporting - but we need to know why to determine if it's "okay" or something that could cause you to lose your data...
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by:mjdey
ID: 10856100
If I go to the bottom of the Disk Manager and right click on the left side here is what it says

Disk 0 (next to it it shows Disk E and then a box for Disk C)
-right clicking on the left side shows the following - Upgrade to Dynamic Disk, Properties, Help

Disk 1 (next to that box is a box that shows Disk D)
-right clicking on the left side on disk 1  shows same as above "Upgrade to Dynamic disk, Properties, Help"

*If I right click on the boxes to the right of Disk 0 I get...
-when I right click on the E drive I get the following options - open, explore, mark partition active, change drive letter and path, format, delete partition, properties, help

-If I right click on the C drive I get the following options - open, explore, change disk letter, properties, help

Disk 1
-if I right click on D drive I get the following options - open, explore, format, delete partition, properties, help


Not sure why I get these different options?  Could I maybe delete the partition for the E and would it all go over to the C and I might be all right ?  
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by:sirbounty
ID: 10857869
No no - don't delete until we figure out what's going on here.
Now from the above, it looks like Disk 0 (Master/Primary) is split partitioned across E & C (which is odd as well, should be the other way around in most cases).

When you right-clicked the Disk 0 & 1, click the properties on that and provide the information stored on the Volumes tab.

Also, were you able to get to C,D & E?  Is there data on D & E that you use?
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by:sirbounty
ID: 10858296
You said:

>>Disk 0 (next to it it shows Disk E and then a box for Disk C)
-right clicking on the left side shows the following - Upgrade to Dynamic Disk, Properties, Help

Disk 1 (next to that box is a box that shows Disk D)
-right clicking on the left side on disk 1  shows same as above "Upgrade to Dynamic disk, Properties, Help"<<

What sizes were shown for these three?
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by:mjdey
ID: 10858303
Volumes contained on this disk
C:  11425mb
E:  19452mb

Volumnes contained on this disk
D:  8040mb

When the E drive suddenly appeared it was empty so I just moved something there and tried it - it worked fine.  I put something there and then I opened it and it worked fine.

I also had the D drive cleaned off so I moved something over there and it opened fine.


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by:ocon827679
ID: 10858889
I might have missed this but if you create a file/directory on C does it show up on E.  This would tell you if the drives are actually the same.
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by:mjdey
ID: 10859039
No it does not show up on the C drive if I put a new folder in the E drive.  Also, none of the files/folders in the c drive show up on the e-drive.
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by:sirbounty
ID: 10859109

>>Volumes contained on this disk
C:  11425mb
E:  19452mb

Volumnes contained on this disk
D:  8040mb<<

The only way I see this displaying correctly is if the above is:

>>Volumes contained on this disk
C:  11425mb
E:   9452mb                <-----------Note the missing "1"

Volumnes contained on this disk
D:  8040mb<<

OR, you have a third drive installed somewhere...
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by:ocon827679
ID: 10859189
Are you sure this isn't a 30 gig drive that you thought was a 20?  Sure looks that way.  
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by:mjdey
ID: 10863104
The label on the drive shows 20gig
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by:sirbounty
ID: 10863231
I'd hate to say start over for a clerical error somewhere... :D

The only reason I would do it, is if things are being misreported - there's a hardware problem somewhere (or the drive's been stamped wrong - LOL)...
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by:mjdey
ID: 10863525
Can you give me the step by step to format and partition for Windows 2000?  Maybe I answered something wrong when I did it before.  Is it better to use Fat32 or NTFS?  

Also, since I have two drives how do I do the Slave drive - format and partition - the same as the Master?

Thanks!
Mary Jo
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by:sirbounty
ID: 10863558
The short version..

#1!!!! Backup your data onto some other media.  You can try placing everything on your second hard drive - or burn it to a CD...
#2 - Insert the Win2k CD and reboot.  If your system boots from the CD, it will go into setup automatically.  From there you have the option to wipe the partition(s) clean and format them.  FAT32 is fine.  NTFS is better if you need greater security.  That's the basic difference between them
#3 - Go through the setup wizard installing W2k on the primary drive (Secondary can be set to slave, yes).
#4 - When setup is complete, partition/format the 2nd HD as appropriate...

See:
http://www.blackviper.com/Articles/OS/Install2kPro/install2kpro1.htm
http://www.windowsreinstall.com/install/win2k/installw2k/index.htm
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sirbounty earned 500 total points
ID: 10863591
If you're really interested...

>>
A Windows XP and Windows 2000 question that comes up frequently both via email and on the Forum is "Which format is the best one to use: NTFS or FAT?"  The answer, of course, is "it depends."  You saw that coming, I'm sure.  In this article, we will discuss some of the things that it depends on, to help guide you to the correct decision for your system.

First of all, the terms.  FAT stands for File Allocation Table, and it dates way back to DOS days, when the operating system fit on a single 360k floppy.  I wonder how many of those floppies it would take to boot Windows XP today?  Beginning with Windows 95 SR-2, FAT was upgraded from 16 bit to 32 bit, and so when we refer to FAT, we are actually talking (these days) about FAT32, not FAT16.  FAT32 overcame some of the inherent limitations of FAT16 disk and volume sizes, as well as directory entry restrictions, long filename restrictions, and large cluster sizes, which wasted large amounts of disk space when storing small files.  FAT32 volumes, in theory, can range in size from less than 1 MB up to 2 TB (TeraBytes).  However, when used with Windows XP/2000, the maximum size of a volume is 32 GB.  Also, the maximum individual file size is 4 GB.  FAT32 is the native file system of Windows 98 and Windows ME, although it is supported by Windows XP/2000.

NTFS, or New Technology Filing System, is the native file system of Windows NT Windows 2000, and Windows XP.  NTFS is a "journaling" filing system, which means that it is less likely to become corrupt, and will recognize errors or bad sections of disk and correct itself automatically.  NTFS volumes can only be accessed (directly, not through shares) by Windows NT/2000, without the aid of third-party products.  Because of the larger overhead, NTFS cannot be used on floppy disks, and the minimum recommended size for an NTFS volume is 10 MB.  However, the maximum supported volume size is 2 TB, and there is no limit on the file size.  NTFS also supports file encryption, file
<< ref: http://windows.about.com/library/weekly/aa001231a.htm

Also:
http://www.techtv.com/screensavers/windowstips/story/0,24330,3201552,00.html
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by:mjdey
ID: 10863683
Can you have a master drive using FTFS and the Slave formated with Fat32?
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by:sirbounty
ID: 10863704
Yes...although it's typically done the other way around.
How come?
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by:mjdey
ID: 10864766
That is what I did when I first formatted and reinstalled the windows 2000 and I wondered if I shouldn';t have mixed the two.  Why is it typically done the other way around?  

And how do I get to the slave drive in order to run the fdisk?
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by:sirbounty
ID: 10864989
>>Why is it typically done the other way around?<<

Couple of things to keep in mind... It doesn't HAVE to be done the other way around.  One benefit, is that it's easier, if something 'breaks' to read FAT32 filesystem from a boot disk (You can't do it, not as easily anyway, if the file system is NTFS).
Also - if you have a dual-boot system (which doesn't apply to you, so this is simply fyi), you wouldn't be able to 'see' an NTFS partition from an older FAT16/FAT32-based file system (Windows 9x, ME, etc).

>>And how do I get to the slave drive in order to run the fdisk?<<
I would say, if you're going to wipe it out and format HD1 - drop the OS there and don't bother with HD2 until you've got the OS loaded - then partition it from within Windows (Start->Run->Diskmgmt.msc)
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by:mjdey
ID: 10868438
Thank you for all your help!
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