hard drive platter transplant

i have an ibm IC35L040AVER07-0 hard drive that stopped working for i'm not sure what reason. i noticed damaged pins on the circuit board connector so i bought a new identical drive and transplanted the new circuit board onto the old drive. the computer still won't detect the old drive. i'm wondering if i can transplant the actual platters from the old dive into the new ibm drive case. is this hard to do or even possible to do at all? if i can do this then i will know if the old hd mechanism is the problem or if it is the platters themselves that are damaged. i'd like to get my stuff off that drive.
gharnettAsked:
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KtoshniConnect With a Mentor Commented:
I'm no expert but I don't think it's possible to switch platters. I believe HDDs are sealed to exclude dust and stuff. There are companies which specialise in retrieving data from damaged HDDs. A quick search on google should find one
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Pete LongConnect With a Mentor Technical ConsultantCommented:
well its possible, but you need to be in a clean room (thats not getting your mother in to dust either) hard drives are built in a sterile forced air enviroment and cant be opened up without damage, your best bet is (as mentioned) a data recovery service.

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CallandorConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Unless you have a clean room (that's a technical term for a special sealed room with air filtration and specific practices to keep it clean), what you want to do is not possible.  Even a small particle like a smoke paricle can cause hard disk heads to crash, so the units are sealed airtight.
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CallandorCommented:
>clean room (thats not getting your mother in to dust either)

LOL
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Pete LongTechnical ConsultantCommented:
:)
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RandyOCommented:
I doubt the pins got damaged by themselves. And I doubt that that is the cause of the failure.  Place the drive in your freezer for about 4 hours, reinstall and try to access it.  This is if "bumping" the drive during start up did not work.  Sounds strange but it does work.   I never tried to replace the board on a drive so am not sure what the pitfalls would have been
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tmj883Commented:
Just atechnical point for Callandor....HDDs are not sealed air tight...they contain a small bleed hole to allow for air pressure equilibrium with ambient while keeping dust out. T
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hockeyfan04Commented:
tmj883 is right about HDDs not being sealed air tight.  There is a small bleed hole, however, there are numerous filters to keep any particle that is not air out.  My best advice is to call a data recovery service.  More than likely if you try to swap the platters you will end up removing any chance of retrieving the data.  

-Brian
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mingtzeCommented:
Not sure if its too late but it has been recently well documented regarding the IBM Deathstar...oops..I mean Deskstar series of hard disks.

This is totally off-topic but it might still help to provide a solution to you.

http://www.pheuron.de/index.htm?deathstar.htm

Good luck, i have personally performed it on my own hard disk (IBM Deskstar 60GXP 20 gb) and it works fine, but I had not experienced the telltale failures signs at the time. Going strong for almost 2 years now..hope you can at least get some data off that disk using the utilities and methods in the link above.
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CallandorCommented:
I'm always happy to learn what I can from other experts :-)
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tmj883Commented:
Please realize comment was not a criticism, just thought you'd like to add that to your personal knowledge base. There are filters to the bleed hole as hockeyfan04 states ranging from simple baffles like a muffler's chambers to sintered filter disks to control contaminates...otherwise the case would be squeezed or inflated in relation to changing barometric pressure/temperatures...: ) T
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CallandorCommented:
No problem, tmj883 - I still remember the info you gave me about cpu fans being capable of overdrawing current from the header on a motherboard.  I don't mind getting the right info from people in the know.
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Pete LongTechnical ConsultantCommented:
:) Thats the best part of this site guy's. For the most part (with sadly a few exeptions) experts treat each other well.
That's keeps me learning and coming back, if i can help anyone out along the way - bonus! :)
Pete
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mingtzeCommented:
If it were me asking the question, I'd split up the points between Ktoshni, PeteLong and Callandor because they addressed my question directly.
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KtoshniCommented:
I reckon mingtze makes a fair point!
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