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Is broadcast traffic affecting network load on my server ?

Posted on 2004-04-19
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Last Modified: 2010-04-11
Here is the situation :

1. I have a Linux server sitting in IP A

2. After watching the number of incoming traffic into ethernet0 (IP A), I found it's increased about 2 MBytes every 5 minutes.

3. Then I run a network sniffer, and I found 2 IPs ... broadcasting something into a broadcast address and to a multicast address.

My question, is broadcast traffic affecting network load on my server ?
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Question by:klompen
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shaggyb earned 55 total points
ID: 10864089
well yes..... but the question is does it really affect YOU and the answer is dependant on how many clients you have on the netwrok and how fast the network is.... if you are running a 100Mbit network and you have 2 or 3 boxes on the network then the answer is no its really not

i would be more concerned if there was somthing running that you dont need to have running that was doing the broadcasting like say a worm..... or what not...

i would check to see what processes are running on each box and see what could be sending out the broadcast packets..... it could just be somthing like netbios too
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by:klompen
ID: 10866213
This issue concerns me after I found that the RX counter of my ethernet0, increased about 2 MBytes every 5 minuts.

RX counter = receiving signal

So, why I got this a lot of incoming traffic ?

Then I run a network monitoring, I watched network traffic in eth0 ... saw minimal, definetely not 2 MBytes/5 minutes. Yes, because this server is still new ... have not published to the public.

Then I run a network sniffer ... I saw a lot of UDP traffic, every second destination = 224.2.243.20:36546

It's a multicast address ... every second!

Also this destination = 66.96.215.255:137 , its a broadcast address.

So that's why I asked ... if there are broadcast traffic ... is it normal that my ethernet0 RX counter (receiving signal) increased ? Maybe because the eth0 processed every network packets even if its not directed to it ... ?

This server is located in an ISP ... a lot of servers in the same networks ... I already asked their support, and they say "this is normal"

But for me not, because now my network monitoring graph ... recorded this 2 MBytes incoming traffic / 5 minutes.

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by:shaggyb
ID: 10866272
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by:Mike_helps_you
ID: 10866654
On a 100Mbit network you won't notice the difference. Just to be safe though, know what is broadcasting.
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by:pseudocyber
ID: 10867768
Are you by chance running any NIC teaming?  They will do a lot of multicasting.
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