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Referencing items in a vector<MyClass*> (EASY!)

Hey. Having trouble referencing items in vector of pointers to a custom class. Here's a small test program. VC++ 6.0 btw.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------
#include <iostream>
#include <list>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class myClass
{
      public:      int id;
};

list <myClass*> LIST;
vector <myClass*> VECTOR;

list<myClass*>::iterator L_iter;
vector<myClass*>::iterator V_iter;

void main()
{

       // intialize list
      for(int i=0; i<50; i++)
      {
            myClass C;
            C.id=i;
            LIST.push_back(&C);
      }

      // initialize vector
      for(i=0; i<50; i++)
      {
            myClass C;
            C.id=i;
            VECTOR.push_back(&C);
      }

      // attempt to access list contents
      for( L_iter = LIST.begin(); L_iter != LIST.end(); L_iter++ )
      {
            cout << *L_iter.id; // error!
      }
      
      // attempt to access vector contents
      for( V_iter = VECTOR.begin(); V_iter != VECTOR.end(); V_iter++ )
      {
            cout << *V_iter.id;  // error!
      }
}
------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Anyway, Ive tried every combination I can think of, it seems like *V_iter->id should be right, but it throws compiler errors.
0
Fippy_Darkpaw
Asked:
Fippy_Darkpaw
1 Solution
 
_corey_Commented:
You need to put *V_iter in parenthesis.  (*V_iter)->id
0
 
Karl Heinz KremerCommented:
_corey_ is right, you first need to dereference the iterator, then you dereference the pointer that you stored.

There are two  more problems in your program (which VSC++ just ignores):
main has to return an integer, so use
int main()
{

    return 0;
}

And, you are defining the "i" variable in a for loop. The standard says that this variable is only valid in the for loop block, you are however using it again in the following for loop. A good compiler will flag this as error. You can work around this by defining the variable before you enter the first loop, or define the variable again in the second loop (which will generate an error with VSC++).
0
 
hal3000Commented:
Hi Fippy_Darkpaw,
More important you are referencing "C" outside tthe for blocks. It is not in scope at that point. The declaration should be moved out of the for loops.

You are also using the same name ("C") for both your list and your vector - this will be a problem.

Good luck
0
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Fippy_DarkpawAuthor Commented:
Thanks. Oh yeah. I forgot to use "new" when creating the list and vector. Here's the fixed version.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

#include <iostream>
#include <list>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class myClass
{
      public:      int id;
};

list <myClass*> LIST;
vector <myClass*> VECTOR;

list<myClass*>::iterator L_iter;
vector<myClass*>::iterator V_iter;

void main()
{
       // intialize list
      for(int i=0; i<50; i++)
      {
            myClass* C = new myClass;
            C->id=i;
            LIST.push_back(C);
      }

      // initialize vector
      for(i=0; i<50; i++)
      {
            myClass* C = new myClass;
            C->id=i;
            VECTOR.push_back(C);
      }

      // attempt to access list contents
      for( L_iter = LIST.begin(); L_iter != LIST.end(); L_iter++ )
      {
            cout << (*L_iter)->id << endl;
      }
      
      // attempt to access vector contents
      for( V_iter = VECTOR.begin(); V_iter != VECTOR.end(); V_iter++ )
      {
            cout << (*V_iter)->id << endl ;
      }
}

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
0
 
AxterCommented:
Why are you using pointers in the first place?
Why not use static type?
list <myClass> LIST;
vector <myClass> VECTOR;

This is safer, easier to read, easier to code, and less potential for bugs.
0
 
_corey_Commented:
Axter,

  I use pointer lists in my code as needed, but I use a custom class that auto-deletes for me as needed.

Corey
0
 
AxterCommented:
>> I use pointer lists in my code as needed, but I use a custom class that auto-deletes for me as needed.

Yes, but the questioner's code does not show a need for it.
0
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