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SOFTWARE RAID

Posted on 2004-04-22
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RAID 1 (Linux software raid)

If my first drive is going bad (bad writes), will the second drive (mirror) also get the bad writes.
What happens in this kind of situation?

How well protected am I with a mirror?
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Question by:Ted22
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jlevie earned 125 total points
ID: 10890694
> If my first drive is going bad (bad writes), will the second drive (mirror) also get the bad writes.

No, assuming that the problem is a disk issue with the first drive. With RAID 1 the system simply writes the same data to both drives. Even if a write fails on one drive the original (correct) data will still be writtern to the second. Assuming only a single drive failure, the only case where the other drive will receive bad data is if the OS has a fault that causes it to send bogus data to the RAID volume.
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by:Ted22
ID: 10890761
That's exactly what I needed to know.
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