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Need to create image of Windows 2000 Advanced Server partition

I need to create an image of a Windows 2000 Advanced Server partition. I'm looking at different products available to do that (Norton Ghost, Drive Image), but am having trouble determining what versions support imaging an NTFS Server partition.

Can someone who's done this recommend a product to get the job done? I have a hard drive with 2 partitions and want to image the partition with the Win2k server operating system as quickly and simply as possible.

Thanks.
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MovnOn
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MovnOn
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1 Solution
 
JammyPakCommented:
ghost is the de-facto standard out there (IMO)...it works just fine w ntfs

i've recently used ghost 2001 and ghost 2002 for this same purpose
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MovnOnAuthor Commented:
I have an older version of Ghost and it didn't recognize that I had 2 NTFS partitions. Since I wanted the Ghost image to be saved to the partition without the operating system, that wouldn't work.
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JammyPakCommented:
Because Ghost runs as a DOS-based program, you can only save the image to a FAT partition. still, you can create an image of an NTFS partition.

I would find another drive, add it to your system, and format it as FAT in order to store the images.
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JammyPakCommented:
you can also save the image across the network to a different machine that has a FAT partition on it....
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MovnOnAuthor Commented:
I don't understand how file formats work very well. You're sure I can save an image of a NTFS partition to a FAT partition without any problems? If I use that image to restore the NTFS partition, it will work fine?
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JammyPakCommented:
Positive.

Where the image is stored doesn't really matter...you can write it to a tape, to a CD, or to a harddrive - anywhere that the Ghost application can write data to. Since the Ghost app is DOS-based, however; it can't see NTFS drives.

Remember, the Ghost image is just a file, same as any other file.

Once you use Ghost to expand that image file back to a hard-drive, then whatever the filesystem of the old drive was (NTFS) is what the filesystem of the new drive will be.
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MovnOnAuthor Commented:
Thanks, this helps.
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