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<div> positioning with different screen resolution.

hi.  i'm having trouble with <div> positioning.  the <div> tag has an <iframe> in it, i'm designing a website based on 1024x768 screen resolution.  viewing this website with 1024x768 resolution, all the contents of the page are relatively in place.  i've used a CSS positioning like this:

div.layout
{
width: 100%;
height 100%;
position: absolute;
}

but the contents of page shifts when viewed with screen resolution greater than 1024x768.  what seems to be the problem?  is it because i've used absolute positioning?  should i use relative positioning in my CSS?

what is the best solution?

thanks.
0
incevolebus
Asked:
incevolebus
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1 Solution
 
BrianGoCommented:
Some browsers may handle things differently but, IE6 ignores absolute positioning if you don't also include top and left values.

IE:

div.layout
{
width: 100%;
height 100%;
position: absolute;
top: 10px;
left: 10px;
}

paste this into a file and view it in Internet Explorer.

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<html>
      <head>
            <title></title>
            <meta name="GENERATOR" content="Microsoft Visual Studio .NET 7.1">
            <meta name="vs_targetSchema" content="http://schemas.microsoft.com/intellisense/ie5">
            <style>
                  div.layout {
                        width: 100%;
                        height 100%;
                        position: absolute;
                        top: 0px;
                        left: 0px;
                  }
            </style>
      </head>
      <body>
      <div style="width: 500px; height: 50px; background-color: #cccccc;">div1</div>
      <br>
            <div class="layout"><iframe src="http://www.experts-exchange.com/"></iframe></div>
      </body>
</html>

You'll notice the frame is absolutely positioned over the div tag.  Now, delete the top: 0px and left: 0px lines from the css section and refresh the browser.  Notice the absolute positioning is no longer being used?

Here's a link to how IE handles positioning.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/workshop/author/dhtml/reference/properties/position.asp?frame=true
0
 
BrianGoCommented:
Sorry, quick followup on your comment as well.  If you use a height and width of 100% (percent being the key) the div will expand to as large as the window will let it.  So, if you view on a resolution larger than 1024x768 it's going to use 100% of whatever you give it.  Rather than using %, use actual pixel values.  

height: 680px;
width: 1004px;

you won't want to use the actual, 1024 x 768 because you have to account for the scrollbars, taskbar, menus...and whatever else is visible on the screen.

IE has some properties you can retrieve from the window object.  run the script below in a web page.  I don't know if this will work in other browsers but it seems like it should.  availHeight and availWidth will be the numbers you want to use for the height and width.

<script language="javascript">
      var s = new String('');
      s+= 'availHeight = ' + window.screen.availHeight + '\n';
      s+= 'availWidth = ' + window.screen.availWidth + '\n';
      s+= 'height = ' + window.screen.height + '\n';
      s+= 'width = ' + window.screen.width;
      alert(s);
</script>
0
 
COBOLdinosaurCommented:
If you use absolute positioning then the element does not reposition in response to changes in resolution of screen size. You are also using width:100% and height 100%.

Therefore on a change of resolution the positon remains static, but the size changes, and the content repositions in response to whatever other css properties or HTML attributes are being applied.

There is no where near enough information to give anything definitive, and we have no idea what the repositioning looks like so post a link to the page, or your code so we have some idea of what is causing the problem.

Cd&
 
0
 
COBOLdinosaurCommented:
>>>IE6 ignores absolute positioning if you don't also include top and left values.

That is incorrect.  It merely requires that the element be given form... and I think the limitation is only in quirks mode.

Cd&
0
 
BrianGoCommented:
give 'em to cobol.

i gave some misinformation...

 >>>IE6 ignores absolute positioning if you don't also include top and left values.

That is incorrect.  It merely requires that the element be given form... and I think the limitation is only in quirks mode.

Cd&

-Brian
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