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A7V8X-X beeping, no video on startup

Posted on 2004-04-24
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Last Modified: 2007-12-19
Hey all,
I'm having a problem with my a7v8x-x.  I just got a new heatsink and fan for my cpu (Athlon XP 2200+) and installed it.  Before installation, my computer worked fine.  After, for some reason whenever I start my computer, all I get are long, repetitive beeps.  I've looked around on google for it so I've already tried some of the possible fixes (Reseating Vid Card, Reseating RAM).  If anyone knows what is going on, help would be appreciated.

System Stats:
ASUS A7V8X-X
AMD Athlon XP 2200+
2 x 256MB DDR RAM
Gigabyte ATI Radeon 9200 128MB
Speeze Heatsink and Fan
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Question by:nate_0000
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by:Pete Long
ID: 10909418
My PC wont boot and its beeping??



From http://www.computerhope.com/beep.htm

 The computer POST (Power On Self Test) which tests the computer insuring that it meets the necessary system requirements before booting up. If the computer fails the POST the computer then returns a beep code indicating what is causing the computer not to post the POST. Generally if the computer POSTs properly you will receive a single beep (with some computer BIOS manufacturers it may beep twice).


THE POST TEST

     Each time the computer boots up the computer must past the POST. The following is the procedure of the POST:

1.  The first step of POST is the testing of the Power Supply to ensure that it is turned on and that it releases its reset signal.
2. CPU must exit the reset status mode and thereafter be able to execute instructions.
3. BIOS must be have readable.
4. BIOS checksum must be valid, meaning that it must be readable.
5. CMOS be accessible for reading.
6. CMOS checksum must be valid, meaning that it must be readable.
7. CPU must be able to read all forms of memory such as the memory controller, memory bus, and memory module.
8. The first 64KB of memory must be operational and have the capability to be read and written to and from, and capable of containing the POST code.
9. I/O bus / controller must be accessible.
10.  I/O bus must be able to write / read from the video subsystem and be able to read all video RAM..  

If the computer does not pass any of the above tests your computer will receive an irregular POST. An irregular POST is a beep code which is different from the standard which can be either no beeps at all or a combination of different beeps indicating what is causing the computer not to past the POST.


YOU NEED TO KNOW THE MAKE OF YOUR BIOS, SEE YOUR MOTHERBOARD HANDBOOK OR LOOK ON THE CHIP

AMI http://www.computerhope.com/beep.htm#3 OR http://www.computercraft.com/docs/beeps.shtml

AWARD http://www.computerhope.com/beep.htm#4 OR http://bioscentral.com/beepcodes/awardbeep.htm

IBM http://www.computerhope.com/beep.htm#5 OR http://bioscentral.com/beepcodes/ibmbeep.htm

Macintosh http://www.computerhope.com/beep.htm#6

Pheonix http://www.computerhope.com/beep.htm#7 OR http://bioscentral.com/beepcodes/phoenixbeep.htm


POST TROUBLE SHOOTING

During the computers boot process the computer performs a POST which is a test that is performed each time a PC computer is boot up. If the computer passes you will receive a normal post which in most cases is the computer beeping one or two times. However in some cases you may receive a no POST or an irregular post indicating something is causing the computer not to pass the test. Below is a listing of some of the general steps that can be performed in helping the computer pass the POST sequence.

Precaution: Some of the following steps recommend removing physical parts within the computer. While within the computer it is highly recommend that you be aware of ESD and it's potential hazards.

First if any added hardware has been added to the computer before the irregular POST we would recommend it be removed to see if it is causing this issue.
Remove everything from the back of the computer except the power cable.
If you are receiving a sequence of beeps see if those sequence of beeps are listed within this page and follow the recommended steps for that beep code. If however your computers BIOS is not listed on this page or you are not sure which BIOS you have within your computer continue with the below steps.
Disconnect the IDE cables from the CD-ROM, Hard Drive, and Floppy drive from the Motherboard. If this resolves your irregular post attempt to connect each device one at a time to determine which device and or cable is causing the issue.
If the above still has not resolved the irregular post attempt to disconnect the Riser board (if possible) with all devices attached to it. If your computer does not include a riser board (ATX Motherboard) disconnect all the cards within the computer. If this resolves the issue or allows the computer to post connect one card at a time until you determine which card is causing the issue.
If you continue to to receive the same problem with all the above hardware still removed attempt to disconnect the CPU and RAM from the Motherboard. If this fixes the issue connect the RAM if the computer still continues to work connect the CPU. Extra Note: If your computer has a Pentium II or Pentium III socket, once the CPU is remove you may receive a NO POST (No beeps). However it is a good recommendation to at least reseat the CPU.
If the issue persists its a good possibility that the motherboard is bad.
Note: Cache is normally not a consideration considering that the Cache controller is usually enabled after the POST, however this can differ.


*****LINKS*****

http://bioscentral.com/
From http://www.computerhope.com/beep.htm
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by:akboss
ID: 10909420
did you place the HSF on correctly?

they sometimes look to fit in 2 different directions but only 1 will sit snugly down on the cpu the other leaves a gap which can cause the beeps you are hearing.

Also never ever force the HSF on the cpu.
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Author Comment

by:nate_0000
ID: 10909450
Yes, I'm sure the HSF is on properly, There is only one way for it to connect and it went on as easily as you can expect one you need a screwdriver for to.  I'll try the stuff from computerhope, but I'm not sure if that's it.  I have Award BIOS so we'll see...
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Author Comment

by:nate_0000
ID: 10909491
Well, my computer has now been stripped down to just motherboard, and I have figured out that I think maybe it wasn't liking my cpu.  I did remove it then reseat it so that I could clean it without getting rubbing alcohol all over my computer so maybe reseating it again will help.  We'll see.
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Author Comment

by:nate_0000
ID: 10909558
I remounted the fan and heatsink, but it still beeps...
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Author Comment

by:nate_0000
ID: 10909710
I checked all my jumpers and reset and the CMOS, but it still beeps!
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Author Comment

by:nate_0000
ID: 10909715
It appears that there is a BIOS update for the a7v8x-x that I don't have, but how am I supposed to update the BIOS without a moniter?
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by:77robert
ID: 10909896
sounds like you done some damage there maybe.
try your old cpu fan just incase.
The beeping sounds like memory but as you was playing around with the cpu fan, id try a new, 2nd hand or a very good m8s cpu :) 1st.  maybe the case that the pc was started for a second without the new fan seated sound ?  
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by:nate_0000
ID: 10909960
Yea, I came to the same conclusion about the fan, but I got the same problem.  I've done this many times before and I really don't think I did damage, I don't see how.  I'm always careful about static, I can't see any physical damage, and it did this the first time I started it up after replacing the heatsink.  It's not the memory because I pulled everything out and added things one by one starting with the RAM and the CPU second.  First test without anything, I got no beeps, Second test with just RAM I got no beeps, but the third test with the CPU I got those beeps again.  I've also reset my cmos and various other things, but I can't track down the problem.
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by:akboss
ID: 10910386
like I said before...wrong placement of HSF can cause a toasted CPU...doesnt take nothing to fry an AMD.

try your old one see if it runs..if so look at the new cpu to be toast...
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by:nate_0000
ID: 10912550
Actually I came up with a different theory.  I think that there aren't enough supports underneath the motherboard and when I was securing the heatsink (it's one of the ones you need a screwdriver for) I bent the motherboard and maybe damaged something.  Is this possible too?
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by:Pete Long
ID: 10912557
its possible something is shorting out on the case, my MSI board used to do this I had to replace all the standoffs with nylon ones :(
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Expert Comment

by:SidewinderX
ID: 10913550
Hmm... unless you ties a lead block to your HSF, you shouldn't have bent the mobo enough to cause damage.

Asus makes good mobos, so it should be fairly sturdy.

did the screw driver slip outta the seat at any time when you were putting the hsf on? It happens to all of us, but you might have hit a cirvut and killed it.



but if it only gives you the POST errors when you put the CPU on, you might have jsut fried your CPU. if it's still under warrenty, see if you cna send it back.
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by:77robert
ID: 10913651
hey SidewinderX who said ASUS make good motherboards other than ASUS :))

anyway nate_0000 its time to stop going round the block and do some real fault finding :))

gogogo
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by:thePENTIUM
ID: 10913920
If it is shorting off of the case, then you could use paper washers in between the mobo and the chassis
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Expert Comment

by:SidewinderX
ID: 10913931
if it were shorting off in the case, there is a very good chance eveyhting would be dead.
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by:akboss
ID: 10914459
my money is still on the HSF being placed wrong and the CPU toasted..
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by:nate_0000
ID: 10922779
SidewinderX's theory about the screwdriver is a good one, it did slip off twice, but I was pretty sure it hit the plastic shield both times.  If I mounted the HSF wrong and burnt out the CPU, wouldn't I be able to see that the die was cracked?  Or is it a microscopic crack...
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Author Comment

by:nate_0000
ID: 10943877
I ordered a new motherboard cause myself and some of my friends think that I damaged something on the mobo itself.  When I get it I'll find out what the real problem is...
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Author Comment

by:nate_0000
ID: 10954176
Well I got the motherboard and have it in and since I'm typing this from my computer, I'm guessing it's working.  Still one problem though.  At first, it my new mobo would only see my athlon xp 2200+ as a 1500.  So I went into the bios and switched the bios to what I thought was the right setting (133 x 13?).  After I did that, my computer wouldn't boot so I reset the CMOS.  It booted again and this time I used MSI's coreCenter to automatically boost my clock speed to try and get to my 2200's speed.  It reaced 121 MHz and won't go any higher without crashing the computer.  Suggestions?
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by:nate_0000
ID: 10954188
"It booted again and this time I used MSI's coreCenter to automatically boost my clock speed to try and get to my 2200's speed.  It reaced 121 MHz and won't go any higher without crashing the computer."  Oops!  Talking about FSB there, not clock.
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Expert Comment

by:SidewinderX
ID: 10954335
hmmm.... try flashing the bios to the latest version.
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