Solved

Problem with SSL keys

Posted on 2004-04-27
4
166 Views
Last Modified: 2013-12-15
Hi,

I have a server with 2 IP address on one card. I have 2 websites that are using one IP each. Both of the website have a SSL cert.  
Both websites have been moved from a different server to mine.

The first website works fine in either normal or ssl way
The second is using the default ssl key of the server, which is something like localhost.localdomain.

I have gone throught the settings and everything seems fine.

Is anybody could have an idea about why 1 website with the same configuration (except for names) as the other one don't get the good SSL key?

Thanks
0
Comment
Question by:e_poirier
4 Comments
 
LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
jlevie earned 50 total points
ID: 10933116
SSL certs are bound to a Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN). When you moved the web sites these certs are associated with did the FQDN of each site remain the same? And can the Linux box do a reverse lookup on each IP and get the correct FQDN for each site. Usually this is a DNS responsibility, but it can also be satisfied by hosts file records on the Linux server.
0
 
LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:gg234
ID: 15247974
0

Featured Post

Free learning courses: Active Directory Deep Dive

Get a firm grasp on your IT environment when you learn Active Directory best practices with Veeam! Watch all, or choose any amount, of this three-part webinar series to improve your skills. From the basics to virtualization and backup, we got you covered.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Over the last ten+ years I have seen Linux configuration tools come and go. In the early days there was the tried-and-true, all-powerful linuxconf that many thought would remain the one and only Linux configuration tool until the end of times. Well,…
Linux users are sometimes dumbfounded by the severe lack of documentation on a topic. Sometimes, the documentation is copious, but other times, you end up with some obscure "it varies depending on your distribution" over and over when searching for …
Learn how to find files with the shell using the find and locate commands. Use locate to find a needle in a haystack.: With locate, check if the file still exists.: Use find to get the actual location of the file.:
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…

726 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question