Solved

Distribution neutral RPM?

Posted on 2004-04-28
2
250 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-21
Hi.
I have a question about RPM and how to build them. I created an RPM for my Mandrake9.2, but alas there are other rpm-based distributions out there. Is there a way to make a distribution-neutral rpm that can be installed on any system?
The rpm I'm trying to package is mostly Python, but there are some C involved.

Can I perhaps make a SRPM? Can this be installed on a machine without devel-tools then?
I can't be the only one wanting to do this, is there a way?

So many questions...

Thanks in advance

Haeger
0
Comment
Question by:haeger
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
2 Comments
 
LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
jlevie earned 250 total points
ID: 10939591
An RPM package is distribution neutral, it is the contents of the rpm that can be distro & version specific. I don't know what your package does or how sensitive it is to differences in Linux kernels, Glibc versions (or other libs), or locations of things. These can and will vary according to distro and version. Also it may matter what version of Python is on the system, with respect to a pre-built binary rpm.

Yes, you could and should also make available an SRPM even if you intend to provide disto/version specific RPM pacakges. There are times when a user will need to build their own copy because of local changes to a particular distro/version. Since you have C code in the package anyone wanting to use the SRPM must have developer support on their system.
0
 
LVL 45

Expert Comment

by:sunnycoder
ID: 10958416
Hi Haeger,

I am not sure but I think SPECS in rpm can handle this issue ... Here is one of the best resources for rpm building
http://www.rpm.org/max-rpm/

Check chapter 9 - Multi-architecture/operating system Support

"It has always been a fact of life for software developers that their applications may need to be ported to multiple operating systems. It is also becoming more common that a particular operating system might run on several different platforms, or architectures.

RPM's ability to support multiple architectures and operating systems makes it easy to build the same package for many OS/platform combinations. A package may be configured to build on only one architecture/OS combination, or on several. The only limitation is the application's portability. "

And yes, if you distribute C source code, users will need gcc and libraries used in the code.

Good luck
sunnycoder
0

Featured Post

Technology Partners: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Have you ever been frustrated by having to click seven times in order to retrieve a small bit of information from the web, always the same seven clicks, scrolling down and down until you reach your target? When you know the benefits of the command l…
The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how we can upgrade Python from version 2.7.6 to Python 2.7.10 on the Linux Mint operating system. I am using an Oracle Virtual Box where I have installed Linux Mint operating system version 17.2. Once yo…
With Secure Portal Encryption, the recipient is sent a link to their email address directing them to the email laundry delivery page. From there, the recipient will be required to enter a user name and password to enter the page. Once the recipient …
Are you ready to implement Active Directory best practices without reading 300+ pages? You're in luck. In this webinar hosted by Skyport Systems, you gain insight into Microsoft's latest comprehensive guide, with tips on the best and easiest way…

734 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question