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Possible alternatives for the future to TCP/IP

Posted on 2004-04-29
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Possible alternatives for the future to TCP/IP
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Question by:Ikram_Bohra
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by:EmpKent
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IPv6.

I think it would be a bit difficult to move to something that was not backward compatible with IPv4... It has become somewhat popular.

Kent
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pseudocyber earned 50 total points
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Well given that IPv4 (current IP) will only allow 4,294,967,296 addresses - there is  somewhat of a problem in running out of numbers.  The early Internet users didn't use the space very wisely and gave out class A's and B's to companies that didn't really need them.  Now, everyone has made do with classless routing, CIDR, and NAT.

But ... IPv6 offers 128 bits of address space (versus the old 32) which will allow for 340,282,366,920,938,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 addresses!  If you take that gazillion number, and divide it by 6.4 Billion people - that leaves 53,169,119,831,396,600,000,000,000,000 addresses for every person on earth.

I think that would be enough to uniquely ID your socks, underwear, rest of your wardrobe, all the parts of your car, house, other systems.  It would probably be enough for the blades of grass in your yard ...

So, in a word, IPv6 is going to enable EVERYTHING to be networked.  I would say that is the future - and after that, if you don't have "the number", you won't be able to function in society anymore ...

As far as transport protocols - who knows - TCP and UDP are doing fine.  I believe TCP may be changed a bit to allow for faster and faster GigE and beyond networking - such as allowing "jumbo frames" for GigE.

HTH


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by:PennGwyn
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Although the introductions of CIDR, NAT and private addressing have taken off much of the pressure to move to IPv6, anyone proposing something else had better come up with a fantastically good answer to the question "Why not IPv6?"  And so far, IPv4 is the only thing that has a good answer:  it's already deployed.

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by:pseudocyber
pseudocyber earned 50 total points
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So, Ikram_Bohra, if you're going to ask such an obiously ... "leading" ... question ... how about the common courtesy of assigning some points?
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by:pseudocyber
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A C!?!?!?
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