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Windows 2000 server boot.ini change

Hi,

I have a dell power edge box that I am placing Windows 2000 Server on.  I did it with the Dell instalation disks which placed a 60 MB Partition on my Raid array and set it as a primary drive.  Now when I try and delete it windows tells me "Deleting this partition will change the number of partitions that contain your windows 2000 system files.  You will have to change your boot.ini file after the delete is complete...."

I know I need to boot the machine up in repair mode but would like any help on what to do next.

Thanks

Brad
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borgbrad
Asked:
borgbrad
4 Solutions
 
sirbountyCommented:
In recovery console type
BOOTCFG /Rebuild

http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=229716
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CrazyOneCommented:
Sorry but the BOOTCFG does not exist in the Win2000 Recovery Console. You would need to boot to the XP or Win20003 RC for this command to even run and it might reconfigure the boot.ini file for Win2000 but I don't know for sure.
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CrazyOneCommented:
>>>60 MB Partition on my Raid array and set it as a primary drive.

60MB's is very small for the main drive. Where are the rest of the system files residing?
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borgbradAuthor Commented:
First time I've done this so I hope this is how I go about answering your quesition.....

Yea I don't know why it's there but I went through Dell's setup procedure and it's a partition that's 60MB (FAT and is considered a primary drive.  The rest of the system files (I think all of them actually) are on the C: partition (NTFS).
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CrazyOneCommented:
Actually as far as know there is no way all the system files are on the C drive if it is really 60MB's
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borgbradAuthor Commented:
Ok when I look at disk management I see 1 drive with 2 partitions on it.  One partition is 60MB which is the first one on the list with a status of "Healthy (EISA Configuration)".  The second partition is labeled C: and has over 500 Gig's on it.  Drive C: is where the system files are located, but because the first partition is a primary partition it says I have to edit the boot.ini file.  The first partition is also not active, what the hell does EISA mean anyway?

Make any more sense?
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CrazyOneCommented:
Ummm EISA I believe means Extended ISA but I may be wrong. I am very concern because Win 2000 uses I believe at least 500MB's of space for a minimal install.
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CrazyOneCommented:
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ewtaylorCommented:
It should be ok, I think that is the partition that contains the dell restore utilities. I just checked my server and it has a 40 meg partition with the same characteristics. I recently reloaded the os on it and seem to recall some of the dell drivers being stored on that partition.
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jonoakleyCommented:
Follow ewtaylor. The primary partition you are looking at is activated during system staartup for system utilities and is accessed by some key combination. Is your system booting to 2000? If not you need to set your RAID boot partition to hte partition containing your 2000 boot files.
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rhrowsonCommented:
The first partition you are seeing is definitely the Dell utility partition (like a Compaq but doesn't work as well). There should be a line in your boot.ini that reads multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1) /fastdetect

Change the file to read multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2) /fastdetect (or whatever the switch is). To get to the file, boot to a Recovery Console using a disk. Run attrib -h -r on boot.ini. Edit the file. Save and reboot. This will point your server to the system files. You may need to experiemnt to get the right parttion, as I ma making an educate dguess of your configuration.
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