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dmboot Event ID: 2

Posted on 2004-04-29
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Last Modified: 2012-08-14
At the start of my server I am getting two warning entries in the Event Log. I can't seem to find any info for what they mean and how to correct them. Thanks in advance:

dmbbot Event ID: 2
dmboot: Volume 1 (C:) started in failed redundancy mode

dmboot Event ID: 2
dmboot: Volume 2 (D:) started in failed redundancy mode

Anyone seen this and know what to do to correct it?
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Question by:Brsmathers
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11 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:ewtaylor
ID: 10953095
Are you running a raid? Check out this link it could be a delay in spinup of the disks http://www.jsiinc.com/SUBP/tip7700/rh7706.htm
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Author Comment

by:Brsmathers
ID: 10953173
Yeah... sort of. I have two hard drives. The second is just for mirroring, but they are on a SCSI raid controller.

I saw this article too, but my drives aren't failing altogether, just starting in failed redundancy mode. What ever that is....
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Expert Comment

by:ewtaylor
ID: 10953297
In disk manager they show up as healthy? No other events in any of the viewers? Have you tried breaking and recreating the mirror?
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Author Comment

by:Brsmathers
ID: 10953328
No, they show up as "Failed Redundancy" instead of "Healthy."

No other event are in teh event viewer. This is the only problem anywhere in the event log.

No, I haven't tried breaking and then re-creating the mirror. Would that make a difference because the primary drive is in failed redunandcy mode?
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Expert Comment

by:ewtaylor
ID: 10953467
Hmm let me think they are in hardware raid? before you break and recreate can you resynch them?
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Author Comment

by:Brsmathers
ID: 10958798
Yeah. Resync them? I don't think i have done that. How do I go about doing that?

You know what..... I just noticed. I think the mirrored hard drive is bad. I think that may be for the reason. In disk management, Disk 0 is there, in dynamic, and good, but Disk 1 is not showing the partitions and it has a "x" through it. When I scroll down I finally can see the partitions for the mirrored volume, but it says "missing" through it. Perhaps it is bad altogether. Sound like a safe assumtion to you?
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by:ewtaylor
ID: 10958882
Well if hardware is taking care of the raid then software will not pick it up as a mirrored disk.  You should go into the raid utilities it should tell you if one of the disks has failed. If not there should be an option to rebuild, resynch, or something to that effect.
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Author Comment

by:Brsmathers
ID: 10959482
Ok. Then I must be mistaken. When i set it up, I did everything in DM. Disk1 has always shown up as good and with mirrored volumes of Disk0.
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ewtaylor earned 50 total points
ID: 10960097
Ahh ok now we are getting somewhere.  Yes it looks like the disk is bad. Make sure you follow the microsoft directions for replacing it.
Recovering a Mirrored Volume
A mirrored volume is provides fault tolerance by duplicating data on two disks. If one disk fails, the data on the failed disk becomes unavailable, but the system continues to operate using the unaffected disk.

If the failure of a mirrored volume did not cause any disruption in service, you can continue running in a non-fault-tolerant configuration and schedule a time to reconstruct the mirrored volume. This activity can occur during a normally scheduled maintenance period or during a less busy time. However, if you have a spare disk in the configuration, you can reconstruct the mirror immediately.

Note The failed disk can be replaced with any disk that is the same size or larger.

It is a good idea to use a disk as similar to the remaining disk as possible.

When you move or replace a disk that was at the end of a SCSI bus, be sure that you terminate only the disk that is now at the end of the bus.

When a member of a mirrored volume is orphaned, you need to break the mirrored volume to expose the remaining volume as a separate volume. The remaining member of the mirrored volume receives the drive letter that was assigned to the complete mirrored volume. The orphaned volume receives the next available drive letter or a new letter assigned to it.

You can then create a new mirrored volume from unused free space on another disk. When you restart the computer, the data from the working volume is copied to the new member of the mirrored volume.

Note In Windows NT 4.0 and earlier, mirrored volumes were known as mirror sets. Disk Management renames all mirror sets to Mirrored Volume. These mirrored volumes reside only on basic disks.

Repairing a Basic Mirrored Volume
When you follow the procedure to repair a basic mirrored volume, the status of the mirrored volume changes to Regenerating and then Healthy. If the volume does not return to the Healthy status, right-click the volume, and then click Resynchronize Mirror.

Note If a basic disk containing part of a mirrored volume is disconnected or fails, the status of the mirrored volume becomes Failed Redundancy and the disk status remains Online. If this happens, you can try to repair the volume.

When you repair a mirrored volume on a basic disk, Disk Management creates a new mirror on a healthy disk and then resynchronizes the new mirror.

Repairing a mirrored volume on a basic disk requires another basic disk with sufficient free space for the new mirror. If an additional disk is not available, the Repair Volume option is unavailable and you cannot repair the volume.

You must use a basic disk to repair a basic mirrored volume (mirror set). You cannot use a dynamic disk.

Replacing a Failed Mirror
If the disk containing part of the mirrored volume cannot be reactivated and the volume does not return to the Healthy status, replace the failed mirror with a new mirror on another disk.

To replace the failed mirror with a new mirror on another disk
1.
 Open Disk Management.
 
2.
 Right-click the mirror on the missing or offline disk, and then click Remove Mirror. Follow the instructions on your screen.
 
3.
 Right-click the volume to be remirrored, and then click Add Mirror. Follow the instructions on your screen.
 

To replace a mirror in the mirrored volume, you need a dynamic disk with unallocated space that is at least as large as the region to repair. If you don't have a dynamic disk with enough unallocated space, the Add Mirror command is unavailable.

Breaking a Mirrored Volume
Breaking the mirrored volume results in two independent partitions or logical drives. No information is deleted, but the data is no longer redundant. Back up the volume before breaking a mirrored volume.

Deleting Mirrored Volumes on a Basic Disk
Deleting a mirrored volume deletes all the data contained in the volume as well as the partitions that make up the volume. You can delete only entire mirrored volumes.

Resynchronizing Mirrored Volumes
Resynchronize a mirrored volume when data on one disk becomes stale. For example, if one disk of a mirrored volume is disconnected, data is written to the remaining disk, but the volume is no longer fault tolerant. If you reconnect the disk, the data on the reconnected disk is stale. To make the mirrored volume fault tolerant again, resynchronize the mirrored volume to update the information on the reconnected disk.

In most cases, mirrored volumes on dynamic disks are resynchronized automatically. However, you need to use the Resynchronize Mirror command for mirrored volumes on basic disks.

Removing Mirrored Volumes
Once you remove a mirror from a mirrored volume, that mirror becomes unallocated space; the remaining mirror becomes a simple volume and is no longer fault tolerant. All data on the removed mirror is deleted.

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Author Comment

by:Brsmathers
ID: 10961978
Thanks. The system is still under warranty, so I have a new hard drive being shipped to me.
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Expert Comment

by:ewtaylor
ID: 10962177
No problem, glad to have been of help
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