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Give a network PC a unique "public" IP address for remote desktop access

We have a Win2k network set up with 1 server, and about 40 clients.  All the clients have an internal IP range 20.0.0.1-20.0.0.255.  There is one system on the network (a win2k server system, acting as a client) that we need an outside user access to via XP's remote desktop function.  Problem is.. we don't know how to give access to this system since it doesn't have a unique "public" IP address... just the unique private IP.

How do we go about setting up this client system to be accessible via the Internet, using remote desktop?  Is there a way we can configure it to have a unique IP, different from our main public IP address?

Hopefully I'm making sense...

-David
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dudinatrix
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dudinatrix
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1 Solution
 
sirbountyCommented:
What sort of router are you using?  If it's the one client - forward the RDP port (3389) over to that private address
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dudinatrixAuthor Commented:
Its a Speedstream DSL modem... Model 5861.  I get what you're saying.. but I'm not sure how to configure the forwarding port.  Do you know how to do that?  It would be greatly appreciated!!
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sirbountyCommented:
What's behind the modem?
Do you have a router of some sort?
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dudinatrixAuthor Commented:
I believe the modem is the router.  Telnetting in displays "SpeadStream 5861 DMT Router"
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sirbountyCommented:
Hmm - not familiar with the model...I'll see what I can find.
Usually there's a Port Forwarding piece in the configuration...
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dudinatrixAuthor Commented:
The problem is, somewhere along the lines.. an IT guy apparently removed the GUI interface for the configuration.. so I'm left with the command prompts of the telnet.  Not sure where to go/what to do!
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sirbountyCommented:
Look here under section 3 - advanced router setup:
http://www.ntplx.net/dsl/SpeedStream.5861.pppoe.html
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dudinatrixAuthor Commented:
Thank you!  I will have to try this tomorrow.. it sounds like its just the answer I need.  I appreciate your assistance!  Once it works, I'll come back and accept your answer..  thank you again!
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meverestCommented:
>> All the clients have an internal IP range 20.0.0.1-20.0.0.255.

you do realise that this is not a range allocated as private network, don't you?

cheers.
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dudinatrixAuthor Commented:
>> you do realise that this is not a range allocated as private network, don't you?

I'm not too sure what that means then.. does that effect what I need to do?  Should it still work?  Like I said, I'll be doing this when I get into work tomorrow.. any info I can get before then will help greatly.

I figured I could use the commands given on the website referred by sirbounty...

system addserver 20.0.0.X tcp 3389
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meverestCommented:
>> I'm not too sure what that means then..

what i mean is that there are three network ranges set aside for private networks:

10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255,
172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255, and
192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255

you can use any of these network addresses inside a private network with no fear of any conflict with the outside world.

whether using something other than the above will cause you any problem depends very much on whether there are any public services using those addresses, and whether you ever want/need to access them.

consider, as an example, if you chose to use the network 216.239.57.0-216.239.57.255 for your internal address range.

what you would find is that everything works just fine..... until you try to access google.com, which just so happens is on that same network. your local systems would think thatthey could find www.google.com on your LAN, and so never be able to find it.

well, you might say "that's ok, we don't need google anyway", which is ok - it's not a problem to use that address range.

so in the end, if there are no services out there that are using 20.0.0.0/24 (and i don't know if there are or not) then you won't have any problem.  and even if they are, if you have no need to ever access those systems, or send mail etc to them, then there's still no problem so long as you don't let packets from your internal net get out with the local source address intact.

sorry for being a little off topic (i am aware that you didn't ask for this advice - but i couldn't help myself! ;-)

cheers.
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NazarelfadilCommented:
if you are using a router to access the internet then you should be using NAT in this case configure your router or RAS server to pass the remote desktop trafic to your desired server.

if you are using ISA server then do the same.

in both casses your network internal ip address is exposed. change it a any private address space.
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